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Suva

Country: Fiji
Population:883,483
Time Zone:UTC+12
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Mud Pool
Hot spring water combines with volcanic ash to form a mud bath pool. Mud baths have existed for thousands of years and found in spas around the world including Fiji. The mud bath treatment is used as a way to relieve arthritis. To take full advantage of the therapeutic value of the mud pools you first coat yourself in mud then stand in the sun until it drys. Wash off in the first natural hot spring pool then walk over to the next clear water pool for another cleansing. Both places offer cheap and very good massage. Pool temperatures are warm to hot.
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Garden of The Sleeping Giant
The Garden of Sleeping Giant is a beautiful orchid garden started in 1977 by the late Raymond Burr, star of Perry Mason and Ironside TV shows. Originally designed to house Burr’s private collection of tropical orchids, the gardens have developed into a popular attraction after years of flourishing. Raymond Burr loved these orchids just as much as he loved Fiji. The garden contains a vast collection of 30 to 40 varieties of magnificent Asian orchids and Cattleya hybrids.
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Sri Siva Subramaniya Swami Temple
Sri Siva Subramaniya Swami Temple is the famous Hindu temple situated in Nadi, Fiji. It is also a largest Hindu temple in the Southern hemisphere and the main deity is Lord Subramanya Swamy. He is the son of Lord Shiva and Goddess Parvathi and his brother is Lord Ganesan. The main statue is specially curved and brought from South India. There are three parts in Sri Siva Subramaniya Swami Temple: Lord Muruga, is the main temple; Lord Ganesh is the second part of the complex; Lord Shiva and Goddess Meenakshi Amman is the third section of the temple. The original Sri Siva Subramaniya Swami Temple of Nadi was founded by Ramaswami Pillai in 1913 on the land leased from the native Fijians.
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Alofaaga Blowholes
These impressive blowholes in the village of taga on south-west savaii are wave power in its purest form, as they propel a roaring jet of water hundreds of feet up into the air. They are particularly worth watching when locals throw coconuts into the holes and these are blasted into the air as well
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Afu Aau Waterfalls,
This spectacular waterfall in south-eastern savaii plunges from the rainforest deep into a fresh-water swimming pool. The Afu Aau Waterfall also known as Olemoe Falls, is a spectacular waterfall in south-eastern Savaii that plunges from the rainforest deep into a fresh-water swimming pool. Access is on a dirt road which is maintained by the village. Entrance fees are collected at the Samoan fale about 650m from the main road and visitors are encouraged to park their car here and enjoy a 10 minute walk to the pool and waterfall.
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Papase'ea Sliding Rocks
Papase’ea sliding rocks are situated in se’ese’e in the faleata district approx. 15mins drive from apia. Brave mother nature’s waterslides and slide down these naturally formed rock slides, worn down by thousands of years of running water. Toilets and change rooms are available. Open mon-sat.
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The Robert Louis Stevenson Museum
The enchanting colonial homestead will give you an insight into the life of one of the most-loved adventure authors Despite his stories of swashbuckling adventure, Robert Louis Stevenson had been a sickly man and had contracted tuberculosis. It was while he was in his twenties someone suggested he find a South Pacific island to live on, where the warm climate would ease his poor health. Stevenson loved to travel, once saying, "I travel for travel’s sake. The great affair is to move." But it was 10 years after that advice that he and his wife sailed to the Pacific and settled in Samoa. TB-ridden Stevenson and his family lived in Samoa for the five years prior to his death. Known to the Samoans as Tusitala or Teller of Tales, the author of the Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, Treasure Island and Kidnapped was intensely involved in the lives of the local folk and their plight to reclaim their cultural identity. The Stevenson homestead is now the home for the Robert Louis Stevenson Museum. The informative forty-minute guided tour of the mansion and Tusitala’s many authentic personal belongings is highly recommended, especially of the library where he penned 14 tomes in just four years. The beautiful Botanical Gardens at the base of Mt Vaea and surrounding the homestead make for an informative and stunning stroll. You don’t have to be a literary groupie to enjoy the scenic walk through lush rainforest up to the top of Mt Vaea where the famous Scottish writer Robert Louis Stevenson rests in peace. Just outside of Apia, the panoramic views over the city and bay are will give another perspective of the capital of Samoa. You have the choice of two routes to the top of the hill – a 45-minute track or, take the shorter but more strenuous half-hour trail. Whichever way you chose, go early in the morning or late afternoon, as the midday heat can be stifling, especially in the height of summer. This is the kind of place you won’t want to leave in a hurry, so pack a picnic and don’t forget your insect repellent and water bottle.
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Piula Cave Pools
Along the main east coast road, 45mins from apia, you will find piula cave pool located at the piula theological college in the village of lufilufi. It’s a beautiful crystal clear freshwater spring pool and cave that originated from an old lava tube. Explore the underwater cave that connects to a second cave. Day fales and toilet facilities available. Open mon-sat: 8am-4pm.
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Tjibaou Cultural Centre
Looking for the perfect introduction to local Kanak culture? Plan a visit to the Tjibaou Cultural Centre in Nouméa, where art, history, culture, knowledge and natural beauty combine to delight and educate adults and children alike. Housed within beautifully designed buildings and landscaped grounds, the centre sits just minutes from the city, offering a fantastic selection of permanent and temporary exhibitions to discover. A visit to the centre is a must for any Nouméa itinerary.
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Saint Joseph's Cathedral
Seat of the archdiocese of Nouméa since 1966, Saint Joseph’s Roman Catholic cathedral was built between 1887 and 1897 by a penitentiary workforce and following the construction plans of a former convict named Labulle. Consecrated in 1890, before the end of its construction, the cathedral is laid out as a 56-meter-long Latin cross, with a 36-meter-large transept. 15.5 meters high, the building's south west facade presents two 25-meter-high towers on both sides of the porch. Both towers, the buttresses and the bay frames are made of cut stone, the other walls are made of lime-rendered rubble stone.
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Moselle Bay Market
Located in Port-Moselle , a stone's throw from the South Province Hotel and the Government of New Caledonia, this covered market is made up of five hexagonal pavilions capped with blue tiles. Fishermen land their fresh fish directly. There are all locally grown fruits and vegetables, flowers, and many other products from the country. The market is also the rendezvous of artisans who offer multiple objects of costume jewelry or decoration. It is also one of the top tourist spots in the city, especially at the weekend with a background of ocean music. The inhabitants of the city find themselves there traditionally to buy their fresh products, but also for the pleasure to meet. On Saturdays and Sundays it is recommended not to arrive too late in the morning to find what you are looking for and enjoy the colorful atmosphere.
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Musee de Nouvelle Caledonie
Built in the 1970s, the museum of New Caledonia asserts, in the late 1980s, its vocation as a museum of society and its objectives as to the enhancement of the Kanak civilization and the preservation of its heritage. Since then, this museum exhibits one of the most beautiful collections of Kanak art in the world, including monumental, and the most complete from the point of view of the themes it allows to address. In view of the Kanak collections of major European museums, the place occupied by the New Caledonia museum in the international museum world is particularly impressive.
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Anse Vata Bay
Formerly named the Duck Bay (like the island located just opposite) because of its swampy side, the Anse Vata neighbourhood now has the same name as the adjoining bay and the 2-kilometer long sandy beach bordering it. Located between the Lemon Bay (Baie des Citrons) and Val Plaisance, it is bounded by the “Rocher à la Voile” on the one hand and the Pointe Magnin on the other side. This South neighbourhood of Noumea, part of the living heart of the city, really looks like a real see side resort. There is a holiday atmosphere and this area is popular with tourists who find here all activities and infrastructure they need: shops, restaurants, water sports, most major resorts and two casinos ... all in one holiday setting at the edge of a wooded beach. Sea activities such as windsurfing are highly successful thanks to the exposure of the bay to the prevailing wind. Many sporting events also start from this place.
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Aquarium des Lagons
Located at Anse Vata bay, the Lagoons Aquarium in Nouméa hosts a variety of corals, fish, crustacean and marine mammals, with some demonstrating the endemism of the New Caledonian aquatic wildlife. Entirely renovated in 2007, the aquarium is today one of the most popular tourist attractions in Nouméa. The Aquarium des Lagons with its multiple different tanks, you can admire a collection of phosphorescent corals unique in the world. The aquarium also boasts a garden featuring a turtle pool. Throughout the year, the aquarium organizes very popular “nocturnals.” They allow you to observe the night-time behavior of the fish and to attend fun awareness-raising workshops on conservation of the lagoon.
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The Amedee Lighthouse
The Amedee Lighthouse was France’s first metal lighthouse and it boasts a unique history. In 1861, due to the many shipwrecks of boats entering the lagoon, Paris ordered a lighthouse to be built for Noumea. Mr. Rigolet, a French engineer from the Eiffel Tower workshops in Paris, started to work on this outstanding monument in 1862. According to one of the clauses in Mr. Rigolet’s contract, the lighthouse had to be assembled outside his workshop in France. For two years, the lighthouse towered above Paris, standing 56 meters tall. After that it was dismantled and divided into 1,265 pieces, weighing 387,953 kilos in total. It was then transported along the Seine River to the port of Le Havre for the final stage of its long voyage to New Caledonia. The Amedee lighthouse is indeed a unique attraction and one of the tallest lighthouses in the world in the world’s largest lagoon.
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Whangarei Falls
Otuihau Whangarei Falls is a picturesque waterfall, falling vertically for 26.3 metres over basalt cliffs. Three viewing platforms allow easy access to the dramatic views and a circular walk around the falls allows them to be seen from all angles. Traditionally this area was a good eeling spot for the local Māori and around the turn of the century it was known as a popular picnic spot from Whangarei. In the late 1920's Mr Archibald Clapham bought the property, reputedly to prevent the falls being developed as a commercial watermill. In 1946 a local businessmen's association raised the purchase price by public subscription and the property became a public domain.
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Abbey Caves
The Abbey Caves Reserve comprises of naturally sculptured limestone outcrops, bluffs, enclosed depressions, sinkholes and three significant caves, Organ, Middle and Ivy. Two distinct areas of native bush with well established podocarp-hardwood forest include particularly fine specimens of puriri trees. Nathaniel and Amelia Clotworthy settled on 409 acres here in about 1860. Their house in the limestone outcrops resembled an Irish ‘abbey’ leading to the name. The house was destroyed by fire in 1920 but the site is still marked by chimney remains. A grave of one of the Clotworthy children also remains from 1884. The land was bought by the Golden Bay Cement Company as a site to establish a mine, but in 1989 they sold it to the then City Council as a reserve for the people of Whangarei.
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Bream Head Scenic Reserve
Bream Head Scenic Reserves is a coastal forest reserve. It is a rich archaeological landscape resulting from more than 500 years of Māori occupation. The reserve is located at the tip of the Whangarei Heads Peninsula. Giant peaks tower at the entrance to the Whangarei Harbour with the Majestic Mt Lion at an impressive 476 meters. An array of walking and hiking trails have been developed throughout the entire forest – from easy walking to challenging hiking.
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Matakana Coast
Pick up fresh local and organic produce at the Matakana Farmers’ Market on Saturdays. Browse the art and craft galleries and find everything from paintings by local artists to the renowned Morris & James Pottery.Visit some of the beautiful white-sand beaches along Matakana’s stunning coastline.
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Rangitoto Island
Emerging from the sea just 600 years ago, pest-free Rangitoto Island is the youngest volcano in New Zealand. An Auckland icon and deeply enriched with history, it's long been a favourite day trip for walkers, and a much loved boating destination.
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Sea Life Kelly Tarlton's
Take an underwater journey through the world famous SEA LIFE Kelly Tarlton's, Auckland and discover a diverse collection of aquatic life up close. See the world’s largest sub-Antarctic penguin colony display, the world’s biggest species of stingray and New Zealand’s largest collection of sharks. Journey through a unique Southern Ocean experience and marvel at our amazing live jellyfish display, find out how we work with rescued sea turtles and visit the magical Seahorse Kingdom where you’ll find the world’s only display of Spiny Sea Dragons, all these and more. For the adventurous we have thrilling Shark Cage Adventure, snorkel in our Shark Cage; Penguin Passport where you can get into our penguin enclosure, get up close and personal with penguins.
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Sky Tower
The Sky Tower has stood tall at 328 meters as an icon of Auckland's sky line for 20 years. It's an exciting hub of adrenaline activities, superb dining and breathtaking views. View the city from 220 metres high above street level. Enjoy panoramic 360˚ views up to 80 kilometres in every direction and spot key landmarks, volcanoes and other historical locations within the greater Auckland area. If dining with a view is what you're after, then you're spoilt for choice with three restaurants and cafes up the Sky Tower - Orbit 360˚ Dining revolving restaurant, the superbly chic and elegant The Sugar Club or relax with your coffee, cheese board or ice cream at the Sky Café. The Sky Tower Gift Shop offers a wide range of Kiwiana gifts and souvenirs, official All Blacks Adidas merchandise as well as many other great keepsakes from the Sky Tower and New Zealand.
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Albert Park
Located in the heart of the CBD, Albert Park is the perfect escape from the hustle and bustle of the city scene. Easily accessible by walking paths around the city, exploring Albert Park is a definite must for visitors to the region. Open to the public 24 hours a day, there is so much to see and do in the Park. Some of the main highlights of the park include the Victorian fountain, Queen Victoria statue and the Laidlaw floral clock that was constructed in 1953. There are a number of different paths leading through the park making exploring it easy and enjoyable. In terms of facilities, the park is fitted with public toilets located between Albert Park House and the Wellesley Street East walkway.
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Auckland Domain
Located a short distance from Auckland CBD, Auckland Domain is a mecca for relaxation and a must-see when in the region. Spread over 75 hectares of land, Auckland Domain is the oldest park in the city and is a popular destination for locals and tourists alike especially on a warm summer day. There are a number of different gardens located in the park including the Wintergardens, one of the most recognisable with the Auckland War Memorial Museum sitting at the highest point, the Formal Gardens, a display from the 1860s with exotic trees, birds and trout, the Duck Ponds, which was the first piped water supply in Auckland back in 1866 and the Band Rotunda standing there since 1912. Auckland Domain is open to the public 24 hours a day for free. There are a number of facilities on the grounds including a water fountain, toilets, sports fields and a dog exercise area located on Gum Tree Hill.
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Auckland Museum - Tamaki Paenga Hira
Welcome to Auckland Museum, where exciting stories of New Zealand people, the Pacific, flora, fauna and landforms of our unique islands, are told within a memorial dedicated to those who have sacrificed their lives for our country.
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One Tree Hill
For exceptional views of Auckland city make your way up Maungakiekie, otherwise known as One Tree Hill. Rising up 182 metres, this volcanic peak is the largest, intact volcanic cone in Auckland - apart from Rangitoto - and is a relaxing drive, walk or cycle up. The volcano is made up of three craters and a lava field that stretches all the way out to the Manukau shoreline.
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Ambury Regional Park
Ambury farm park lies among the southern suburbs fronting the Manukau Harbour. Take in the various farm animals as you wander around the open pasture. Ambury is a significant habitat for shorebirds and the coast has excellent examples of basalt lava flows.
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Rainbow
With over 20 rides and attractions, there's something for everyone, every day of the year except Christmas Day. If you are a thrill seeking enthusiast, the Stratosfear, our brand new ride, is just for you. Or if you'd like something a little less scary, perhaps the Log Flume or Pirate Ship. It's your fun, and you can put it together any way you like!
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Action Stations
Action Stations provides nature and cultural based experiences in the Tauranga region and beyond, including around the upper half of the North Island of NZ.
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The Elms - Te Papa Tauranga
The Elms | Te Papa Tauranga, one of the oldest heritage sites in New Zealand. As a place of early contact between Māori and Pākehā, this historic site remains at the centre of Tauranga’s history and identity today.
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Bethlehem Shopping Centre
This stylish outdoor shopping complex on Tauranga’s northern city fringe is open seven days a week and features a range of boutique stores, large retail chains, popular cafes and professional service providers.
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Waimarino Adventure Park
Bring your family, swimsuits, barbecue supplies or picnic and make a day of it with one of our two adventure park pass options, or if you’re short on time, come down and rent a kayak by the hour. Our adventure park pass system is designed so once you have purchased a pass for the park you won’t need any more money for the rest of the day. You can enjoy, get wet, relax and most importantly have fun, without needing to reach for your wallet. Enter the park knowing that the day is yours to enjoy with our supreme pass. The Blob, The UFO, rock climbing and unlimited kayak hire; the fun is just starting. Slide down NZ’s only kayak slide. Beach volleyball is a hit while others enjoy the challenge on Waimarino’s new low ropes course.
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Fernland Spa
Our pure mineral geothermal pool complex, situated in an oasis of spectacular bush and park-like grounds 5 minutes from downtown Tauranga. We have one large main pool nestled among towering tree ferns and native foliage, enjoy the bird song during the day and the magical lighting at night. Or choose one of 8 spacious private pools, all have a changing area, toilet and shower. Our pools are 100% pure, crystal clear natural mineral water. All pools have a continuous flow of fresh mineral water and are emptied cleaned and refilled daily. A great stopover for camper vans with large sites and a tranquil environment, free access to the main pool is included.