active-pinPinned places
active-place
unLiked
Sacrewell Farm
Open all year round, there is something for everyone at Sacrewell Farm. Come and meet the friendly farm animals, visit the Shire Horse Centre, enjoy a bumpy tractor ride, and play in the indoor activity barn. Don’t miss your chance to discover our 18th century working Water Mill too. If you want to visit for the day or stay on our charming campsite, we guarantee you’ll find plenty to entertain the whole family whatever the weather! The camping and caravan facilities include electric hook-ups, toilets and showers. Dogs are welcome.
unLiked
Sacrewell Mill
The rich history of Sacrewell’s multi-award winning Grade II* listed, 18th century watermill goes back, as far as we know, to 1086 and the Domesday Book, although the lie of the land suggests the Romans were using water power at Sacrewell hundreds of years earlier – perhaps even from the sacred well that gives Sacrewell its name.
unLiked
Burghley House
Built and mostly designed by William Cecil, Lord High Treasurer to Queen Elizabeth I, between 1555 and 1587, the main part of the House has 35 major rooms on the ground and first floors.
unLiked
Peterborough Cathedral
With one of the most dramatic West Fronts in the country, an extraordinary creation of medieval architecture, it would be easy for the interior to be an anticlimax, but it is not. The dramatic Romanesque interior is little altered since its completion 800 years ago and the whole building has recently undergone cleaning and restoration following the dramatic fire of November 2001. The Cathedral is a great place to visit for all ages. You can download an interactive trail with augmented reality animations for mobile phones and tablets (search for Gamar Ltd in your app store, then Peterborough Cathedral Trail), explorer backpacks designed for smaller children and an activity book for older children. With over 1350 years of Christian worship on the site, this is a treasure-house of religious and historic artefacts. Highlights of any visit include Saxon carvings from the earlier buildings on this site, the unique painted nave ceiling, amazing fan vaulting in the 'new' building, elaborately carved Victorian Choir stalls and the burial place of two queens, Katharine of Aragon and Mary Queen of Scots. In the Cathedral Visitor Centre there is a fascinating timeline of objects that tell the story of the site from Roman times to the present day, and a model showing how the abbey was built in medieval times. The abbey was closed in 1539 on the orders of Henry VIII, but instead of being demolished, as so many monasteries were, it was re-launched as the Cathedral of a brand new diocese in 1541 and is still the seat of the Bishop of Peterborough and mother church for the diocese which covers Northamptonshire, Rutland and much of Peterborough.
unLiked
Railworld Wildlife Haven
The Railworld Wildlife Haven is testament to what can be achieved when volunteers, companies, groups and individuals work together for a common goal – Encouraging Environmental Awareness. Rev Richard Paten our founder chair and life long volunteer – brought the land over 30 years ago and we have raised funds to create what we have today.... We have never had any core funding, but we have won six major UK Environmental Awards and one Worldwide Award from Caterpillar. We are located alongside Peterborough Nene Valley Station – There is ample car parking and we are easily accessible, 15 minutes walk from Peterborough’s main railway station. Railworld has 2,000 sqft of model railway, with hands-on exhibits. We have the unique hover train RTV 31.
unLiked
Peterborough Museum and Art Gallery
Located in one of the city's most historic buildings, Peterborough Museum has a wealth of stories to fascinate and enthral all the family. There are some amazing objects and interactive displays for all ages. The collections comprise over 200,000 items of great national and international importance. " Explore the historic building and its story: from private house to hospital and museum. Go inside the original Victorian Operating Theatre to learn about the grisly history of surgery. " Visit an underwater world! See the internationally important collection of fossils of Jurassic sea-monsters and find out more about the creatures that swam in our prehistoric seas over 150 million years ago. " Discover the story of the world's first prisoner of war camp, built 200 years ago during the Napoleonic Wars. See inside one of the cells and view the incredibly intricate items made by the French prisoners. " Learn about the story of Peterborough, from prehistory to the present. Come face-to-face with Britain's oldest murder victim, see Roman and Saxon treasures, look inside a Victorian railway cottage and clock in to find out what Peterborough companies have made over the last century.
unLiked
Elton Hall and Gardens
The Hall has been home to the Proby family since 1660. It is an enchanting house which has evolved throughout the centuries. Every room contains magnificent treasures, from late 15th century Old Masters to Reynolds, Constable and remarkable Victorian painters such as Millais and Alma Tadema. Each generation has collected books and there are three libraries containing over 10,000 books. One of the most remarkable is Henry VIII’s prayer book with inscriptions by him and his three children. The garden has been lovingly restored over the last 35 years with mature topiary, a Gothic Orangery and billowing flower borders set between immaculately cut hedges.
unLiked
Key Theatre
Situated in Peterborough's city centre the Key Theatre brings great entertainment to the area with the theatre programme made up of 'home-grown' productions, national touring shows, local community productions and a full programme of one-off concerts. Also part of the Key Theatre is ‘Riva’ the fabulous restaurant offering excellent food, plus views of the Nene embankment, making this a stunning setting for city-centre dining. The Key’s pantomimes are renowned throughout the region for their quality and traditional sense of good, clean, family fun. And with over 30 years of experience, it’s no wonder that thousands of children have grown up enjoying panto at the Key and many now bring their own families too!
unLiked
Peckover House and Gardens
Peckover House lies at the heart of the North Brink in Wisbech, one of Britain's most perfect streetscapes. From the 1790s it was home to the Peckovers, a fascinating dynasty of Quaker bankers, collectors and philanthropists who created the spacious Victorian garden that lies behind the house. The majority of the indigenous Peckover collection was sold during a two day sale after the death of Alexandrina Peckover in 1948, but the house is still full of interesting artefacts, objects and stories.
unLiked
Flag Fen Archaeological Park
Visit Flag Fen Archaeology Park to explore how the prehistoric people of the fen lived over 3000 years ago. Wander through a Bronze Age village, sit within the reconstructed roundhouses, and stand where our ancestors once stood by the ritual causeway. Experience life in our prehistoric past and visit the only place in the UK where original Bronze Age remains can be seen in situ, the incredibly preserved timbers of monumental engineering achievement. Excavations on the site revealed details of a wooden platform and post alignment that stretch for nearly a kilometre across the fen. These were built up between 1350 and 950BC and are of great national and international significance. Due to the waterlogged nature of the fens, this unique monument has been remarkably preserved. It is believed that the post alignment consists of 60,000 vertical timber and 250,000 horizontal pieces of wood, spanning the wet and marshy fen to meet a droveway on dry ground at each end. All the pieces of wood had been worked and shaped with tools.
unLiked
The Prebendal Manor
Described as a hidden gem and dating from the early 13th century the manor is the oldest property in Northamptonshire. Included in the visit are a large recreated medieval garden, fish ponds and dovecote. The Tithe Barn museum houses artefacts from the archaeological excavations and the history of Nassington. The Manor is an affordable and fun place for families. A children's trail, corn grinding, pottery making in the holidays, quill pen writing, dressing up the farm animals add to the enjoyment. The manor and gardens provide a unique experience for groups, with guided tours of the manor and gardens. Morning coffee or homemade teas are available. Lunch can be provided by prior arrangement.
Have we missed one?
You can add a new place,
sight, landmark, attraction,
things to see
Add a Place
Explore more places related to this search:
unLiked
Wysing Arts Centre
Wysing Arts Centre is a registered charity that provides a range of programmes for artists and ongoing exhibitions, public events, activity for young people, families and schools. Our large rural site near Cambridge includes a gallery, educational facilities, artists studios, a recording studio and ceramics studio, a 17th century farmhouse, outdoor sculpture, and café.
unLiked
The Bridge of Sighs
Neo-gothic covered bridge linking the new court of St. John's with the older original college buildings. Built in the 19th Century and named after the covered bridge in Venice, on which prisoners would sigh as they were escourted to their cells.
unLiked
University of Cambridge Museums
The University of Cambridge has 8 museums and the Cambridge University Botanic Garden, which when combined, has the country's highest concentration of internationally important collections outside of London.
unLiked
Kings College Chapel
King’s College Chapel is a masterpiece of English craftsmanship. It’s part of one of the oldest Cambridge colleges sharing a wonderful sense of history and tradition with the rest of the University.
unLiked
Byard Art
Contemporary gallery Byard Art is located in the historic centre of Cambridge, opposite King’s College Chapel. Its innovative exhibition programme of solo and mixed shows by contemporary artists offers a unique selection of two and three-dimensional work, all in a friendly and welcoming environment. All of Byard Art artwork is original, and varies in medium, scale and price.
unLiked
Cambridge Arts Theatre
A thriving regional showcase, Cambridge Arts Theatre is an outstanding theatre, a beacon for the development of arts professionals and a much-loved regional and national institution, whose history is rooted in the city of Cambridge. The Theatre is the only high-quality presenting theatre within 60 miles serving the population of Cambridgeshire and the surrounding area. Founded in 1936 by the economist and founder member of the Arts Council, John Maynard Keynes, The Theatre has helped launch the careers of theatrical luminaries such as Ian McKellen, Derek Jacobi, Emma Thompson and Stephen Fry. Today Cambridge Arts Theatre is the venue of choice for all scale-appropriate drama, dance and opera in both the subsidised and commercial sectors, building strong and mutually beneficial relationships with the cream of the country’s touring producers and bringing productions to the region that diversify and enrich the city’s cultural offering.
unLiked
Museum of Archaeology & Anthropology
The Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology at the University of Cambridge displays world-class collections of art and artefacts from all over the world. Objects ranging from stone tools and pots to sculptures and paintings represent cultures and histories over millennia, and great recent and contemporary works reflect the diversity of peoples worldwide. MAA’s collections span nearly two million years of human history, on all six inhabited continents, and together with rich documentary and photographic collections, they reveal much about not only archaeology and anthropology, but also about world art and world history.
unLiked
Sedgwick Museum of Earth Sciences
The Sedgwick Museum of Earth Sciences is the oldest of the University of Cambridge museums, having been established in 1728 as the Woodwardian Museum. Since then the collection has grown from about 10,000 fossils, minerals and rocks, to at least 2 million. A walk through the museum will take you on a 4.5 billion year journey through time, from the meteoritic building blocks of planets, to the thousands of fossils of animals and plants that illustrate the evolution of life in the oceans, on land and in the air. Also a major teaching and research resource in the Department of Earth Sciences, the Sedgwick Museum collections are a national treasure.
unLiked
Fitzwilliam Museum
With over half a million incredible artworks in its collection, the Fitzwilliam Museum is one of the most impressive regional museums in Europe, presenting world history and art from as far back as 2500 BC to the present day.
unLiked
Cambridge University Botanic Garden
Since its opening in 1846, Cambridge University Botanic Garden (CUBG) has been an inspiration for gardeners, an exciting introduction to the natural world for families and an oasis for all its visitors. Supporting leading scientific research and welcoming 300,000 visitors a year, CUBG is one of the largest University-owned botanic gardens in the world. The Garden’s living plant collection of over 8,000 species is spread across 40 acres of landscaped gardens. The collection, which includes iconic, threatened and endangered trees and plants, supports University research which focusses on meeting many of the world’s greatest future challenges (such as food security, climate change and medicine). The Garden also inspires schools, the local community and visitors from around the world about the importance of plants and plant science, horticulture and the joy of gardening.
unLiked
Naturescape Wildflower Farm
Our wild flower farm visitor centre which we believe is the first of its kind in the UK, is situated on Coach Gap Lane, Langar, Notts. It Opened in 1990 and fulfills our objective to provide a site open for demonstration, information and personal Read More
unLiked
Victoria Park
Victoria Park is a fine green space next to the University of Leicester campus. The centrepiece of the park is the magnificent memorial arch, built to commemorate the dead of the First World War. The arch was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens, as were the beautiful wrought iron gates at the parks Peace Walk and London Road entrances. The area served as the city's racecourse until 1883; upon the racing find a new home at Leicester Racecourse in Oadby, the area was transformed and is now a peaceful retreat from the buzz of the city. The park has areas of formal flowerbeds as well as winding pathways shaded by avenues of trees– perfect for finding some shade and enjoying a picnic or a good book on a summer’s day. For more active visitors, the park is home to a bowling green, croquet area, 4 tennis courts, football and rugby pitches, a floodlit Astro pitch and an outdoor gym.
unLiked
De Montfort Hall
De Montfort Hall has been one of Leicester's premier entertainment venues for over a century, hosting live music ranging from pop to classical, theatre, stand-up comedy, musicals and operas. The venue hosts an eclectic range of quality shows, including live music and festivals from rock to pop, touring West End musicals, internationally recognised comedians, opera and orchestra, ballet and dance and children’s shows. De Montfort Hall is set amongst beautiful gardens, which occasionally host outdoor stages to treat visitors to stunning views whilst enjoying the show. The hall is proud to have been a residence of the Philharmonia Orchestra since 1997. Acknowledged as one of the world's greatest orchestras, the Philharmonia run a programme of concerts as well as community and educational events each year. The hall is also home to a magnificent pipe organ; it has almost 6,000 pipes and is believed to be one of the last surviving example of its kind in the world. It was constructed in Leicester by organ builders Stephen Taylor and Son Ltd., and was a gift to the town by local industrialist Alfred Corah.
unLiked
New Walk Museum & Art Gallery
New Walk Museum & Art Gallery, Leicester's original museum, has wide ranging collections and displays spanning the natural and cultural world. A family friendly day out, the galleries include Ancient Egypt, Dinosaurs, Wild Space, The Den gallery for the under 5s, the Victorian art gallery, Arts & Crafts gallery and a modern and contemporary art gallery. The first floor galleries include World Arts, Picasso Ceramics: The Attenborough Collection and Leicester's internationally renowned collection of German Expressionism. The museum welcomes a vast array of temporary exhibitions, featuring works from the collections, touring exhibitions from national museums and a programme of contemporary art and craft displays.
unLiked
Curve
Curve is a spectacular, state-of-the-art theatre in the heart of Leicester’s vibrant Cultural Quarter. Opened in 2008 by Her Majesty The Queen, the award-winning building designed by acclaimed architect Rafael Viñoly offers a completely unique visitor experience. Unlike any other theatre in the UK, there is no traditional backstage area. Audiences can enjoy the full theatre-making process, peek behind the scenes and maybe even spot an actor or two dashing from the stage to their dressing room or enjoying a coffee in the café. The building’s stunning curved façade is made from 1,192 tonnes of steel and 46,000 square metres of glass. Managed by Leicester Theatre Trust, Curve is a registered charity providing engaging theatrical experiences for the community. Working with people of all ages and backgrounds, the theatre is committed to nurturing new and emerging talent, as well as creating world-class productions.
unLiked
Belgrave Hall & Gardens
Belgrave Hall is a historic house, providing an oasis of peace and quiet in a busy city. The hall was built in the early 18th century in what was then a small village three miles from the town of Leicester. Now city traffic passes, almost unnoticed, just beyond the garden walls. Edmund Cradock, a hosiery merchant, built Belgrave Hall but died soon after its completion. The Hall has had several owners over the years, including John Ellis – a wealthy businessman who was responsible for bringing the railways to Leicester. Visitors can explore Belgrave Hall and the beautiful surrounding gardens on special event days. From April to September the gardens are open every Wednesday and the first full weekend of the month, with additional special events open to the public. Visit the website for more details on specific open days.
unLiked
Abbey Park
Hugging the banks of the River Soar in the north of the city is Abbey Park – a beautiful green space to relax and admire Leicester’s riverside scenery. The park has a choice of activities to keep the whole family entertained. The boating lake in the centre of the park offers hire of both rowing and pedalo boats – fun for adults and children alike! On a summer’s day, relax and pedal your way around the beautiful lake in the centre of the park, enjoying the sweeping views of serene parkland all around. Heritage lovers will enjoy a stroll around the remains of the twelfth century Leicester Abbey and the ruins of Cavendish House, a 17th century mansion. The Abbey was founded by the second Earl of Leicester, Robert le Bossu. It became one of the wealthiest Augustinian abbeys in the country, but closed in 1538 when Henry VIII dissolved the monasteries. Whilst converting the overgrown abbey grounds into a public excavations revealed the remains of the abbey church and the other main building ranges, which can be seen in the park today. Those looking to get active can take advantage of the parks many sporting facilities, including a bowling green, five hard surface tennis courts, orienteering courses, a lavender maze and Ping! table tennis tables – perfect for those looking to try something new or get in some extra practise. Pets Corner is a favourite with all visitors to the park – an area to interact with a variety of small, domesticated animals. The area includes an aviary with a collection of exotic birds, as well as small enclosures housing hens, guinea pigs, rabbits, goats and pygmy goats.
unLiked
National Space Centre
The award-winning National Space Centre is an out of this world experience for the whole family! With six interactive galleries, the UK’s largest planetarium, world unique 3D SIM ride and iconic 42m high Rocket Tower, there really is something for everybody to enjoy. The rocket tower is pretty impressive for people of all ages, as it towers 42m into the air and its semi-transparent “pillow” design can be seen as you approach the Centre from any direction! It is home two rockets: Blue Streak and Thor Able, as well as a Gagarin Experience, Apollo Lunar Lander and real Moon Rock. Each year the National Space Centre hosts many special weekends which in the past have included celebrations of Star Wars, LEGO and Daleks. School holiday periods are always exciting, as the Centre adds plenty of workshops and talks into the mix, so advanced booking is advised. A visit to The National Space Centre wouldn’t be complete without a visit to the Cargo Bay Shop to pick up a souvenir as a memento of your journey to outer space. The shop boasts a full range of fun and interactive space toys, books, games and telescopes.
unLiked
Leicester Cathedral
Leicester Cathedral lies at the heart of Leicester's Old Town. The cathedral is open for visitors and all are welcome within its doors. From the fine stained glass to the story and tomb of King Richard III, explore over 900 years of history in this peaceful and beautiful building. The tranquil Cathedral Gardens surround the cathedral. A quiet space in the heart of the city, the gardens are made up of areas of lawn, flower beds, seating areas and a water feature. The gardens are also home to two pieces of public art: the iconic bronze statue of King Richard III, commissioned by the Richard III Society in 1980, and the sculpture 'Towards Stillness' – an installation representing a timeline of the King's life, especially commissioned for the occasion of his reinterment.
unLiked
The Lanes
Get lost in Leicester’s Lanes, whose winding cobbled streets bristle with fantastic independent stores. Selling everything from classic styles to one-off pieces to make a statement in your home or wardrobe, The Lanes has something to suit all tastes.
unLiked
The Guildhall
The Guildhall is a historic building and the oldest building still in use in the city. It was Leicester’s first police station and between 1876 and the 1900’s and saw many unsavoury characters pass through its doors. The Great Hall itself was built in about 1390 as a meeting place for the Guild of Corpus Christi (a small but powerful group of businessmen and gentry) and it’s also believed that Shakespeare performed here during Tudor times. Over the years it has had many uses, including housing one of the oldest public libraries and serving as the Town Hall. After restoration, the Guildhall was opened to the public as a museum in 1926. Today the Guildhall is best known as an excellent performance venue, attracting acts from across the country, and as a museum where visitors can step back in time and come face to face with Crankie Gemmie and Emma Smith, two of Leicester's notorious pickpockets who can be found lurking in the Victorian police cells. The museum is also home to the Medieval Leicester galleries. Through objects and activities, visitors can walk the streets of medieval Leicester and uncover a world both familiar and very different to our own!
unLiked
Bradgate Park
Bradgate Park was first enclosed as a deer park around 800 years ago. It provides 830 acres of publicly accessible countryside close to Leicester City Centre. The Park offers a wild and rugged landscape with dramatic rocky outcrops and gnarled old oak trees, many of which are well over 500 years old. The landscape offers some of the finest views, and is rich in change throughout the seasons.
unLiked
Great Central Railway
Here you will find the UK's only double track, main line heritage railway – and the only place in the world where full size steam engines can be seen passing each other! Trains run every weekend of the year, bank holidays and selected week days in the summer months. There are four stations on the line, all of which have are wheelchair accessible: Loughborough Central Station (LE11 1RW), Quorn & Woodhouse Station (LE12 8AG), Rothley Station (LE7 7LD) and Leicester North Station (LE4 3BR). For a first class experience, why book onto the restaurant car service which provides a five course meal whilst travelling between Loughborough and Leicester? Or you can make your childhood dreams come true and try out the ‘Drive a Locomotive’ experience, where you can take the regulator on a mighty steam locomotive or notch up on a powerful diesel. With all this as well as special events, Great Central Railway is a great day out for all the family!
unLiked
Green's Windmill
Green's Windmill in Sneinton was built by the father of notable scientist and mathematician George Green in 1807. Today the working Mill is a popular museum and science centre, which teaches new generations of children about the valuable work of George Green. Sadly, the mill was badly damaged by a fire in 1947 but was later restored by Nottingham City Council in the 1980s. The windmill began milling again in December 1986 and the giant sails can still be seen working to this day. George Green was a mathematical genius who developed new ways of doing mathematics, which has helped scientists to understand the world around us. Test your brainpower with the hands-on experiments in the Science Centre which explore electricity, magnetism and light, ideal for young children.
unLiked
William Booth Birthplace Museum
Discover the life and work of William Booth – Nottingham’s most famous preacher and social reformer and founder of The Salvation Army – at The William Booth Birthplace Museum. Travel back in time to William’s home as it would have appeared in 1829 and explore how William turned his vision into reality.
unLiked
Redsmith Distillery
Redsmith Distillery is the only gin maker and distillery in the City of Nottingham. Come to the creative heart of the city and meet Jenny the Redsmith still No.1. At the heart of every distillery is the still itself where the spirits are created. The Redsmith still named Jenny was designed and built in Nottingham by Redsmith founder Wayne Asher. Just in case you are wondering, why Redsmith? Redsmith is another name for a coppersmith and a fair amount of coppersmithing went into building Jenny. Learn about gin and how it is made whilst tasting the multi-award-winning Redsmith London Dry Gin as well as other fabulous gin expressions created at this tiny micro-distillery. Owing to the boutique nature of the distillery the team at Redsmith's can only host up to seven guests at any one time.
unLiked
Stonebridge City Farm
Stonebridge City Farm is a slice of the country in the heart of Nottingham City! We are free to enter and open every day for everyone to enjoy. Its ideals include providing a much-needed green space, sustainable buildings, distinctive local identity and people who care and respect the community. The site is accessible to all – families with young children, people with disabilities, and parties from schools and colleges. You can just come for a while, perhaps to feed and pet some of the animals, or we do courses and special events for beekeepers and people interested in horticulture. The farm has been accredited with many awards for its efforts and contributions over the years, as we provide so much to the community and would like to take pride in this.
unLiked
Reg Taylor's Garden Centre
Walk into Reg Taylor's Garden Centre and you enter into a different world. It's not just a quality Garden Centre wonderfully set out over a 25-acre site, it's a place where there is the widest choice and most incredibly beautiful things for your garden and for your home. It's maintained and created each day by the Taylor Family themselves who have grown the business for well over 70 years and today are passionately dedicated to being assistance, advise and help in whatever you need to make your garden and home special. To visit Reg Taylor's is to have an amazing experience, you’ll want to come back again and again throughout the changing seasons and the year ahead. At the heart of the business, the hands-on approach and knowledge of the Taylor family is evident in the enormous choice and quality of Nursery Stock at very competitive prices. From Bedding Plants, Houseplants, Fruit Trees, Soft Fruit, Ornamental Trees to Roses, Alpines, Semi Mature Trees, Perennials, Climbers, Shrubs, Conifers, the list goes on!
unLiked
Nottingham Contemporary
Nottingham Contemporary is one of the largest galleries of contemporary art in the UK. The gallery hosts regularly changing exhibitions of international art. Nottingham Contemporary is set in an iconic building, designed by the award-winning architects Caruso St John, in the heart of the city centre. Alongside the exhibitions, Nottingham Contemporary runs a full programme of events, including talks, film screenings, music and performances. Free drop-in family activities take place every weekend and throughout school holidays. The café, Ottar at Contemporary serves a seasonal, ripe, and varied menu, as well as award-winning chocolates and a selection of delicious cakes.
unLiked
Nottingham Council House
It takes a building of some distinction to stand out in a city as rich in beautiful and interesting architecture as Nottingham, and the Council House does not disappoint... Far from being a museum, The Council House is a vital, living part of the city and the centre of local politics as elected councillors who represent the people of the City of Nottingham conduct much of their business here. This magnificent Neo-Baroque building, whose 200ft high dome dominates the city skyline, has been the heart of the city centre for 80 years and a source of pride for the people of Nottingham. On a still day, the chimes from the Council House clock, known as Little John, can be heard for miles around. It has been the setting for many splendid public occasions. Royalty, statesmen and women and people from the world of showbusiness have been received and entertained here. The FA and European cups have been held aloft from its balcony, and a great many worthy organisations and individuals have received the thanks of a grateful city within its walls.
unLiked
Nottingham Society of Artists Gallery
There is always plenty to see at the home of The Nottingham Society of Artists. Situated only a few yards from the entrance to Nottingham Castle, the splendid gallery has a vibrant programme of exhibitions throughout the year, showing a wide and varied selection of work from members of the Society as well as from amateur and professional artists from all over the county.
unLiked
Ickworth House Park & Gardens
A taste of classical Italy brought to Suffolk – discover the spirit of Ickworth. There’s so much to see indoors and outdoors at this beautiful National Trust country estate with great visitor facilities including ample parking, West Wing café, Porter’s Lodge café, children’s play area, plant centre and gift shop. Just four miles from Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk.