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Panama City

Country: Panama
Population:408,188
Time Zone:UTC-5
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Catamaran Tour
This 6-hour excursion is the perfect way to have an extraordinary day by going to the closest island to the city. Relax and discover the art of sailing on board the biggest open boat of the city. Sunbathe, lay down and enjoy the big deck with huge nets and speakers. The catamaran has shaded areas for those who need a break from the sun.
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The Biomuseo
The Biomuseo unites, in a unique way, science, art and design to tell the story of how Panama changed the natural world as we know it.
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Monkey Island and Gatun Lake
The Monkey Island Day Tour is boat exploration of Lake Gatun and a great opportunity to see 4 different species of monkey, all within 40 minutes of Panama’s capital city. You will also see many other animal species such as Crocks, Toucans, Sloths and many exotic birds. The tour also gives you the chance to bath in spring fed natural pools and kayak in the lake.
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Anita Villalaz Theater
aried shows of all theatrical genres are performed on stage at these theaters in the capital city.Anita Villalaz Theater, is one of the known theater in the city.
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San Blas Islands
The San Blas islands are a group of islands in the archipelago de San Blas, located in the Northwest of Panama facing the Caribbean Sea. There are 378 islands within the archipelago and they are scattered around in an area of about 100 square miles. If you leave the Golfo de San Blas by boat you will enter the Caribbean Sea. The majority of the 378 islands have no inhabitants, but on the larger ones you will find the gentle native people known as the Kuna’s. These people can be found on the larger inhabited Islands; Aguja Island, Guanidup Island, Chichimei, Yandup Island and El Porvenir. You may ask yourself What is san blas? San Blas is an autonomous territory in Panama formerly called Kuna Yala. The San Blas Islands are the number #1 vacation destination in Panama and probably in Central America. The native people living on the Islands of San Blas call themselves Kuna’s or Guna’s. The district/region in Panama where you can meet the native inhabitants is officially named after them; Guna Yala or Kuna Yala.
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Panama Viejo
Declared World Heritage by UNESCO, it was founded in 1519. Panama was the first city built on the Pacific Ocean coast during the Spanish colonial period in America. Its geographical position turned it into a golden transit point and the fabulous treasures of the American continent were sent to Spain and, therefore, it was also a coveted booty for pirates. In 1671, the city was sacked and destroyed by the famous pirate Henry Morgan. Today is a place visited by all those who wish to relive with imagination that distant era of mythical heroes and villains.
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Contadora Island
Contadora Island is the only island of the Pearls that can be reached by flying from Panama City. The island is located near the coast of Panama, at around 50 miles away. Isla Contadora is well known for its famous resorts and hotels. The place is magical in every sight but still offers the luxury of home. The island of Contadora became world famous when in 1979 the Shah of Iran retreated there in exile. This put the spotlight on the islands as an exclusive and expensive island for the rich and the famous. Since then Contadora’s popularity began to grow and the first Hollywood stars started to invest in there private getaways. The reality show Survivor put the Pearl Islands and Contadora in many countries on the map as tropical paradise. Tourism became to flourish and the islands are not only for the rich and the famous anymore.
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Cruise through Panama Canal
Panama is world-famous for its 48-mile canal that connects the Pacific Ocean with the Atlantic Ocean. Each year, over a million people visit the canal and are able to witness this engineering marvel at work. Panama is very proud to have this magnificent creation operating 365 days a year, enabling the world's cargo to be shipped efficiently and safely to new destinations.
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Anton Valley
In the mountains of the district of Coclé lies the small town El Valle de Antón, known as the second largest inhabited volcano crater. Once a crater lake it became home to Indians from the surrounding mountains. The microclima here, next to the cloud forest created amazing varieties of flora and fauna. Also El Valle is one of the best places in Panama for watching tropical birds. You will find them in the valley and in the cloud forest of the Gaital Monument.
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Casco Viejo
Everyone wants the inside scoop on Casco Viejo, Panama's most charismatic neighborhood. Today, Casco Viejo (aka. Casco Antiguo, San Felipe or El Casco) is a vibrant community consisting of a sharp contrast of old and new, local and foreign. The buildings are in various stages or redevelopment and renovation, with a strictly enforced standard of Historical Authenticity. There is tremendous culture and a feeling which is unique only to this neighborhood in Panama.
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Metropolitan Natural Park
The Metropolitan National Park is a 232 hectares forest located in Panama City. Some of the tree species that you can admire here are the wild cashew, luehea semannii, gumbo-limbo, guanacaste and yellow mombin, amongst others.
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Artisan Market (Mercado Artesanias de 5 de Mayo)
Visiting markets is the best way to get to know the culture of Panama. Mercado Artesanias de 5 de Mayo is is the best place to buy molas, the traditional handmade fabrics woven by the Guna Yalas.
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Cinta Costera
From the Cinta Costera you can see an impressive view of the entire city of Panama. You can also observe the boats that line up to enter the Panama Canal from the Pacific Ocean, while enjoying the green areas, recreational parks and public spaces ideal for walking or exercising. In this picturesque route you will find the seafood market, which offers an excellent restaurant within the enclosure, and more than a dozen small outdoor restaurants selling fried fish with patacones and ceviches in all its varieties.
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Rio Claro
If you’re looking for more than just a one day trip then Rio Claro is a great option. Just three hours east of Medellin Rio Claro offers the chance to get up close and personal with Colombian flora & fauna whilst also being able to participate in various outdoor activities such as rafting, caving and zip lining through the canopy.
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Santa Fe de Antioquia
Small historical town located just 2 hours from Medellin. It was the capital of the region before the control of power was shifted to Medellin. If you’re interested in colonial architecture, white-washed walls, weathered churches (like The Catedral de Santa Fe de Antioquia, located in the main plaza) and old town squares then Santa Fe is a perfect day trip from Medellin.
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Guatape - El Penol
The small town of Guatape is a colourful and tranquil pueblito (small town) perfect to enjoy a day trip (or two) from Medellin. Whilst the town is famous for the colourful designs on the facades of the houses it’s probably more recognisable in promotional material for the the large rock “El Penol” which you can climb to get an amazing view of the surrounding man-made lagoons.
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Bolivar Square
Bolívar Square lies at the center of Manizales and is surrounded by the Cathedral Basilica of Our Lady of the Rosary and the Governor’s Palace, among other buildings. In the square you can admire Bolívar Condor, a sculpture made in tribute to Simón Bolívar made by Rodrigo Arenas Betancourt, as well as ceramic murals by local artist Guillermo Botero.
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Cathedral Metropolitan Basilica of Our Lady of the Rosary
The origins of the Cathedral Metropolitan Basilica of Our Lady of the Rosary date back to 1927, when the French architect Julien Auguste Polti was entrusted to rebuild it after a fire in 1926. Construction began in 1928 and ended in 1939, after work was interrupted due to the Great Depression of the 30s. The Cathedral measures 25,833 square feet and can accommodate 5,000 people.
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Lovers Park
Lovers’ Park (also called Santander Park) was built in the early 20th century and is characterized by a statue of General Francisco de Paula Santander and a bust of former President Manuel Murillo Toro in the centre.
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The Colon and Bolivar peaks
The Colón and Bolivar peaks the highest points of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta (at 5,775 and 5560 meters above sea level, respectively) and are considered sacred places by the ancient Tayrona culture, whose descendants are responsible for ensuring for environmental balance of this zone.
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Tayrona Park
On one side the waves smash against volcanic rocks that are lined up next the beach: on the other side you seem to see a mirage because it would seem that a portion of the Amazon jungle arises in the midst of the Caribbean.
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The Tolima Art Museum
A place where the artistic trends in this region are appreciated is the Tolima Art Museum, which has seven exhibition halls in which collections of Colombian painters and traveling works of different regional, national and foreign artists are exhibited.
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The Parque de la Musica
An outdoor space in which the citizens of Ibagué converge to spend the afternoon is the Parque de la Música, located next to the Conservatory of Tolima. As the name implies, musical performances are usually held here.
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La Merced Chapel
La Merced Chapel is one of the most important places to visit in Cali, as the city’s inaugural Mass was delivered here on July 25, 1536. A 15th century wood carved statue of the Virgin of Las Mercedes is kept inside.
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Enrique Buenaventura local theater
he Teatro Municipal Enrique Buenaventura is the cultural centre of Cali built using early 19th century architecture influenced by Creole classicism.
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San Pedro Cathedral
The neoclassical San Pedro Cathedral has endured the damage from several earthquakes; it underwent some restoration and is now a Cultural Asset of National Interest.
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San Gil
San Gil, 96 km from Bucaramanga, you can discover other extreme sports. Rafting is one of its most popular activities here with experienced guides offering several trips on the rivers. The excursions which take place on either the Fonce or Suarez river offer adventurers differing levels of difficulty, making use of rafts, kayaks or hydrospeed - a form of river bodyboarding.
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Chicamocha National Park
Chicamocha National Park in Panachi, about 50km from Bucaramanga, to see the world’s longest cable cart. This cart is no less than 6 km long and contains 39 cabins, each of which has a capacity of eight passengers. The system covers the entire Chicamocha canyon from La Mesa de los Santos to Panachi and includes three stations in between, allowing people to get out for a moment and enjoy the park by foot.
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OLAYA HERRERA NATIONAL PARK
Visitors can find rest and relaxation on trails surrounded by gardens and trees in the Olaya Herrera National Park, which was established in 1934.
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THE GOLD MUSEUM
At the Banco de la República’s Gold Museum, visitors witness an unforgettable experience: as they stand in a dark room, bright lights suddenly switch on to reveal hundreds of gold ornaments. The museum features about 13,000 gold artifacts and 20,000 stone and clay objects originating from various pre-Hispanic cultures.
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Colon Theater
The Colón Theater opened on October 27, 1892 to commemorate the 400th anniversary of the arrival of Christopher Columbus to America, and was reopened in July 2014 after a renovation that began in 2008. The restoration of the front curtain, which features "dolls" or "monkeys" drawn on a nineteenth-century linen cloth, was an important part of this renovation.
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Museum of Contemporary Art of Zulia
The Museum of Contemporary Art of Zulia is a national institution of multiple cultural actions designed to insert itself deeply into the community. MACZUL is a cultural project born in Maracaibo thanks to the initiative of the University of Zulia. The MACZUL art collection is mostly made up of high-quality contemporary artworks of aesthetic and creative significance or of documentaries, historical, technical and/or didactic importance, such as paintings, sculptures, drawings, engravings, designs, prints, illustrations, photographs, textiles, fireworks, video art and experimental non-objective artistic manifestations.
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Plaza del Rosario de Nuestra Senora de Chiquinquira
This is a beautiful plaza with several wonderful sculptures. It is located near the Santa Barbara Church and has beautiful fountains around it. The plaza is home to the Virgin of Chiquinquira’s monument which is 18 meters tall. Then there are some nymphs with wings around the monument that are paying a tribute to the Virgin.
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Aquaventura Park
This park is worth visiting, if you are traveling to Maracaibo with your children. There are several exciting rides, pools and other interesting activities you can enjoy there. The staff of the park is well-trained and friendly.
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Castillo de San Carlos de le Barra
This is a historical castle built in the seventeenth century to protect the residents of Maracaibo from pirate attacks. It was the time when the city was attacked by pirates more often. Later, this castle was used for different purposes in different eras. In the nineteenth century, the Venezuelan army used it for military purposes. Then during Juan Vicenre Gomez’s dictatorship, it served as a prisoner for political antagonists. The government declared the Castillo de San Carlos de le Barra a National Historic Landmark in 1965.
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Treasure Beach
Travelling on Jamaica’s South Coast, you’ll discover a treasure chest of coves and bays, where the Caribbean meets our sandy and sometimes rocky shores. A mixture of dark and white-sand stretches, rocky coves, fishermen’s enclaves and secluded swimming spots, the South Coast’s shores promise a range of possibilities. A favourite beach community of both locals and visitors alike is Treasure Beach (a spot that surely lives up to its name). Treasure Beach is a six-mile stretch of coral-coloured and sometimes black sands, private coves and rocky shores. For travellers who want to discover the South Coast’s vibrant local culture and people and are in search of untrodden beaches, a visit to one of Treasure Beach’s main bays – Billy's, Calabash, Fort Charles (also known as Starve Gut) Great and Frenchman’s – is a must. In Calabash Bay, friendly fishermen dock their brightly painted canoes and unload the day’s catch. Visitors swarm, waiting patiently at beachfront cafes and stands, so they can be first to enjoy it – soon to be seasoned and grilled to perfection. Other uniquely Jamaican dishes, such as curried goat, jerked meat and pumpkin soup are also available at roadside stands at Treasure Beach’s public beaches. All lovely, laid-back stretches are well-suited for swimming, snorkeling, biking, hiking, and of course, the mellow vibes of kicking back in the sun with a cold Red Stripe in hand.
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Fort Charles
The first fort to be erected in Port Royal was Fort Charles. It was built in the late 1650-60 and was originally called Fort Cromwell but was renamed Fort Charles. The fort underwent several changes between 1656 -1670. In 1667, the fort had 36 guns and by 1765 it had 104 guns and a garrison with 500 men.
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Port Royal
One of the oldest and most historic regions of the country, Port Royal has maintained much of its independence as well as its heritage. Once the enclave of pirates and other outlaws, there is still a strong seafaring tradition. Much of the old city, described in the 17th century as the "wickedest city in the west", lies underwater beside the town, the result of an earthquake that in 1692 swallowed about two-thirds of the then-living space. Since then, another earthquake in 1907, numerous hurricanes, fires, and various population-decimating diseases have plagued the town. Despite all, the waters around Port Royal are a virtual archaeological gold mine, filled with pieces of history that tell of everyday life in the earliest days of English occupation. Port Royal is also home to the Archaeological Division of the Jamaica National Heritage Trust (JNHT), which recently completed a sonar survey of the underwater city, revealing a sunken pirate ship in the Kingston Harbour. To date thousands of artefacts have been recovered, and there are plans to develop a local museum to showcase these items once the research on them is complete.
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Liberty Hall
Liberty Hall located at 76 King Street, Kingston was the centre of activities for the Kingston division of The U.N.I.A. It was acquired in 1923 for eight hundred pounds sterling (£800). The two-storey building was the first meeting hall in Jamaica that was fully owned and operated by blacks. It was the home to plays, concerts, dances, elocution pieces, adult and children's choirs. One famous play, which took place here, was the "Slave Ship", which recaptured the horrors of the Middle Passage. Liberty Hall was so named because of Garvey's great admiration for the Irish independence movement and the Irish Transport and General Workers Union whose headquarters in Dublin was named Liberty Hall in 1912. It was at this place, described as "the fortress of the militant working class of Ireland" that many plans were made for Irish self-determination, and Garvey saw the U.N.I.A struggle as being akin to that of the Irish. Liberty Hall is decked in colours red, black and green, which are of much significance. The red denotes the blood of the Negro race nobly shed in the past and dedicated to the future; black represents the colour of the skin and green represents a promise of a better life in Africa. This monument stands as a proud reminder to all Jamaicans, and indeed to all visitors of the works and achievements of the great visionary and National Hero the Rt. Excellent Marcus Mosiah Garvey.
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Trench Town Culture Yard
The Culture Yard today hosts a small museum which presents the phenomenal history of Trench Town along with articles, instruments and furnishing used by Tata Ford, Bob Marley, Peter Tosh and Bunny Wailer. The original 1940's buildings have been restored to their former glory and the site is truly a heritage tourism destination.
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National Heroes Park
The area on which the National Heroes Park now stands was once one of the most popular spots in Kingston. For 101 years, the land was the centre for horse racing in Jamaica. It was also the site for other sporting activities such as cricket and cycle racing. Being a place where people naturally gathered, the area was also the venue for travelling circuses that visited the island from time to time. The site was officially renamed the National Heroes Park in 1973 and is now a permanent place for honouring our heroes whose monuments are erected in an area known as the Shrine. Another section, reserved for prime ministers and outstanding patriots, adjoins the Shrine area, to the north.
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Bustamante Museum
24 Tucker Avenue is the former residence of the late Sir Alexander Bustamante. In 1940 Bustamante was held in detention at Up Park Camp for allegedly inciting workers to protest against low wages and poor working conditions. From this location he instructed his attorneys from the legal firm Judah and Randall, to build a home on the half-acre of land he had brought in 1939. Bustamante's attorneys had the house completed within a year and around the same time Bustamante was released from detention camp. The house was at first rented for a couple of years before it was occupied by Bustamante. The building is a contemporary style 3 bedroom, 3 bathroom concrete house with a combined hip and gable end and timber shingle roof finish. Louvre windows are reflected throughout the design, with the exception of the pivoted sash windows of the bathrooms. This Tucker Avenue home now has its place in Jamaica's history because a National Hero lived there and because of the eventful conferences which took place there. The house is now open to the public as the Bustamante Museum and consists of a multimedia exhibition with artifacts on display.
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Devon House
Sitting on 11 lush acres in the capital city, the stately Devon House mansion was the home of Jamaica’s first black millionaire, George Stiebel. It was built in 1881, on what was originally a 51-acre property.
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Bob Marley Museum
Museum dedicated to the memory of the late Reggae superstar, Robert "Bob" Marley. The museum is located in Marley's original studio where he recorded many of his songs.
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Hope Botanical Gardens
There are many rare and beautiful species of tropical plants and trees at the Royal Botanical Gardens, including the Hibiscus elatus (blue mahoe), the national tree of Jamaica. Blue mahoe is a small spreading tree with flowers that open in primrose colour in the morning and change to orange and deep red as the day advances.
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Croydon In The Mountains
The award-winning Croydon Plantation is a working estate nestled in the foothills of the Catadupa Mountains and offers visitors breath-taking, panoramic views of the surrounding countryside. Visitors are invited to take in the rich history of the plantation, which is the birthplace of Samuel Sharpe, one of Jamaica's national heroes. Tours operate on Tuesdays to Fridays and offer the opportunity to taste many different varieties of pineapple and citrus fruits. Sample exotic and delicious fruit and the juices made from them. This tour also includes a delicious feast of barbequed lunch served with world-famous Jamaican Blue Mountain Coffee.