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Osijek

Country: Croatia
Population:88,141
Time Zone:UTC+2
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Kopacki Rit Nature Park
Kopacki Rit (pronounced ko-pachkee rit) Nature Park is a flood area ( rit means marsh) between the Drava and Danube rivers in the Osijek-Baranjska region of eastern Croatia. Sometimes called "the pearl of the Drava", the nature park covers 177 sq kilometres holding more than 20000 waterbirds in winter of 267 different species. You'll find cormorants, herons, gulls, terns, ducks and egrets Some of the birds such as the black stork and the great white egret are rare in Europe but the most prized inhabitant of Kopacki rit is the largest Croatian eagle, the white-tailed eagle. As the largest remaining wetlands in Europe, Kopacki rit changes in accordance with the seasons. In spring, high waters, mostly from the Danube, flow in the marshlands bringing fish that come to spawn in the shallows The warmth makes the water plants, plankton and insects flourish making it one of the most fertile spawning areas of the Danube region Spring is also marked by an explosion of frogs. In the central part of the reserve is a lake that is connected to the Danube by a canal that serves as a conduit for most of the water throughout the marshlands The north part of the park is composed of willow, poplar, oar and ash forests. Here you'll find deer, wild boar, fox wildcats, martens, weasels and other creatures.
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The Co-cathedral Church
The Church of St. Peter and St. Paul is the co-cathedral of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Đakovo-Osijek. A co-cathedral is a cathedral church which shares the function of being a bishop’s seat, or cathedral, with another cathedral, often in another city.
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Statue Of King Petar Kresimir IV
Located Near the old Hotel Krka you can find a statue of Croatia’s King Petar Kresimir IV.
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Croatian state archives in Osijek
Croatia State Archives in Osijek is a public institution founded by the Republic of Croatia and the territorial jurisdiction now extends to the area of ​​Osijek-Baranja County and is one of 18 regional archives.
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The Victor
Ivan Meštrović’s masterpiece “Belgrade’s statue of the Victor” is just one part of the fountain that was planned to be the crowning jewel of Serbia’s capital. Fountain remained unfinished, and the Victor being too liberal for the eyes of war-ravaged Belgrade, was sent from a shed in Senjak, not to Terazije, but to the edges of Kalemegdan’s fortress instead, where the spirits that brought a new age upon us made it a symbol of Belgrade. Three years before the World War I the Terazije’s Plateau was reconstructed so that between the two lanes was left enough space for a splendid fountain. City officials entrusted the construction of the fountain to the most famous Yugoslav sculptor – Ivan Mešrović. His idea was to make the commemorative drinking fountain with its central masterpiece, the Victor, which was supposed to symbolize the freedom of a five century long slavery under the Turks, and the final victory.
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Belgrade Fortress
Belgrade Fortress stands on top of a cliff overlooking the confluence of the Sava and the Danube. This is the last raised ground in the Balkan Peninsula before the vast stretch of flatland of the Pannonian Basin, extending all the way to Central Europe. The Fortress controls the access to the Pannonian Basin and the navigation on the Sava and the Danube, a position of outstanding strategic importance, accounting for its role as a border fortress throughout much of its history. It served to guard the border between the Roman Empire and barbarian lands across the Danube and the border between the Ottoman and Austro-Hungarian Empires, to name a few, which explains why it was so often destroyed, rebuilt and redesigned. The Romans were the first to build a fort at this site in the late 1st century as the HQ for the IV Roman Legion - Flavia Felix. Its remnants are barely visible today. Belgrade Fortress consists of the Upper Town, Lower (or Water) Town and Kalemegdan Park. The present layout of the Fortress took shape in the late 18th century, but there used to be many more buildings within its walls that had perished in different battles.
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Kalemegdan Park
Kalemegdan Park is Belgrade’s birthplace. Filling much of the promontory where the Danube and Sava Rivers converge, the green sprawl was settled millenniums ago by the Celts and bears traces of many successive peoples and empires. F
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Zepter Museum
The Secessionist building at No. 42, built in the 1920s as a bank, was converted several years ago into the Zepter Museum, a vault of 20th-century and contemporary art.
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Kecskemet Town Hall
The neighbouring building is the Town Hall built by the plans of Ödön Lechner and Gyula Pártos. The 150-year-old building of the City Hall was demolished in 1892. József Katona, the writer of our national drama worked there for 10 years. He collapsed and died at the entrance. The cracked stone monument set up at the scene of his heart attack in front of the building reminds us of this tragic event. The notice on this monument says: „The heart of the son of Kecskemét broke here.” In 1895 the offices moved into the building of which area is 5534 m2 and has 174 rooms. On the 8th July, 1911 there was a huge earthquake in the city which did not spare the City Hall either. Its collapsed chimneys and cracked walls were soon reconstructed under the direction of Ödön Lechner. The style of the building with its nearly rectangle-shaped ground-plan mixes the forms of the French Renaissance architecture and the elements of our popular art. The Ceremonial Hall is the venue of the General Assembly meetings of the city, national and international conferences, wedding ceremonies and ceremonial receptions. The period furniture of the Ceremonial Hall is handicraft work. The wooden furniture and the printed leather backed chairs were made in Szeged according to the design of Lechner and Pártos. The beautiful and richly coloured glass windows were made in the workshop of the famous Miksa Róth. The decorative wall-painting was made by Adolf Götz, the wall-candlesticks and the chandelier were made by Sándor Árkay, Imperial and Royal locksmith upon the basis of the designs of Szilárd Várady. The paintings were made by the famous Hungarian painter Bertalan Székely. These paintings show some periods of the Hungarian history embracing one thousand years.
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Big Catholic Church
Let's start our walk in the main square of the "Famous Town" that used to be the market-place for centuries. Here you can find the Big Catholic Church which is the largest cathedral in the Great Hungarian Plain built in the style of the age of Louis XVI of France. Looking down from the 73 meter tall tower you can see the panorama of the town.
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Lutheran Church
Let 'us go towards the main square again. About 100 meters away on your right in Arany János Street you can find the Lutheran Church built in the 19th century. Until the end of the 1980s Miklós Ybl’s masterpiece, decorated with Romanesque motives, was hidden by cheap stores; today it can be seen in its original beauty.
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Sarajevo's Old Clock Tower
Sarajevo’s clock tower is 30 meters high and it is believed that it was built in the 16th century. The tower's clock is the only public clock in the world that keeps lunar time (“à la Turk”), to indicate the times for the daily prayers. According to this system, the new day begins at sunset, when the time is shown as 12:00! Since the length of the days change throughout the year, it was the duty of a muvekit (timekeeper) to maintain the clock’s accuracy. In the courtyard of Bey’s Mosque there is one kind of observatory, a muvekithana, which is where the exact time would be calculated with the help of careful techniques and sensitive instruments. The tower's current clock mechanism was brought from London in 1875 by Sarajevan merchants, Hašimaga Glođo and Mehaga Kapetanović. A famous watchmaker and former muvekit from Sarajevo, Abdulah Kasumagić, gilded the hands and numbers on all four of the clock faces.
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The Cathedral of Jesus' Sacred Heart
The Cathedral of Jesus’ Sacred Heart was built in 1889 in the Neo-Gothic style and is the seat of the Archdiocese of Vrhbosna. The interior of the church is richly decorated and it was the famous Italian-German painter, Alexander Maximilian Seitz, who did the frescos. The Cathedral of Jesus’ Sacred Heart also houses the tomb of Josip Stadler, who served as Archbishop of the Archdiocese of Vrhbosna at the beginning of the 20th century and initiated the cathedral’s construction. There is also a statue in front in honor of Pope John Paul II, who visited Sarajevo in 1997, soon after the war had ended, to send a message of peace and tolerance from BiH’s capital city.
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Gazi Husrev Bey's Mosque
Gazi Husrev Bey’s Mosque, or Bey’s Mosque, as it is known locally, was built in the center of Baščaršija in 1530. Bey’s Mosque was designed by Adžem Esir Ali, a Persian from Tabriz, who was the chief architect in the Ottoman Empire at that time. Today, this mosque is rightly seen as the most important architectural monument from the time of Ottoman rule in Bosnia and Herzegovina. There are many Bosnian leaders buried in the mosque’s courtyard, including Reis-ul-Ulema, Mehmed Džemaludin Čaušević; the politician, Dr. Mehmed Spaho; the reformer, Ali Bey Firdus; the poet, Safvet Bey Bašagić.
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National Museum of BiH
The National Museum of BiH was founded on February 1, 1888 and was first housed in a building next to the Sarajevo Cathedral. Construction of the facility in Marijin Dvor, the museum’s current home, got underway in 1909 and was completed in 1913 and designed by Karl Paržik. The museum allows visitors to take “a short walk” through BiH’s past, from earliest times all the way to the ethnology exhibit, whose interior captures the atmosphere of a traditional city house during the Ottoman period. The most valuable item in the museum’s collection is the famous Sarajevo Haggadah, which the Sephardic Jews brought to Sarajevo when they left Spain. There is also the rich collection in the natural history section which covers both living and non-living worlds, including a skeleton of a bearded vulture, a bird with a giant wingspan which used to fly in the skies above BiH not that long ago.
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Bezdin Monastery
The Bezdin Monastery is a monastery dedicated to the Assumption, located in Lunca Muresului Natural Park, near the village Munar, Arad County, on the right bank of the river Mures. The monastery was founded in 1539, the name comes from the Bezdin lake located in the eastern part of the monastery. During the Ottoman occupation, the monastery was burned by the ottomans, and in 1690 a brick church was built in Byzantine style as a form of clover with three abisade. Inside the church is a miraculous icon of Our Lady, brought from Mount Athos.
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St. Mary and St. Nepomuk Monument
The monument has two names – both used: “St. Mary monument” and “St. Nepomuk monument". Both are (and were) correct, but could cause confusion: there was another “Mary”, quite famous, and it is in the namesake square from Iosefin, and there is also another Nepomuk near the Millennium Church in Fabric.
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Libertatii Square
Libertăţii Square is undoubtedly the oldest of the Timişoara squares. Libertăţii Square’s location is also the site of the original nucleus from which Timişoara’s evolution started, the first place where people settled and lived continuously in the hearth of today’s city.
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The City Market
Fresh food and groceries which are prepared daily are becoming a more important part of everyday life, and in the Varaždin market this trend is confirmed. In the flurry of trading you can buy fruit and vegetables, as well as other culinary delights that arrive fresh every morning from family farms in Varaždin and its surroundings.
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The museum Of Firefighting
Although the smallest of all city museums, the Museum has proved attractive to a many visitors. There is a long tradition of fire fighting in Varaždin as the City has been damaged several times by fire. The first Varaždin volunteer Fire Brigade formed in 1864, making it the first in the region.
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The Old Town Varazdin
At the northern edge of the historical centre of Varaždin separated from the city by embankments and moat, is the Old Town Castle of Varaždin. This military fortress was unassailable from the outside due to the moat which was fed by the river Drava canal and the cannons inside the walls that in some places were 2.5 metres thick. Inside is the Old Town’s Renaissance Palace, whose aristocratic owners have continually changed and adjusted it to suit their tastes from the 13th to the 19th Century. Today the entire Old Town is the Varaždin City Museum. Former illustrious owners include the Counts of Celje, Jan Vitovac, Ivaniš Korvin, Juraj Brandenburg, Counts Ungnadi and many others. The Erdödy Family ruled the City for the longest time, and the first owner was the famous General Tomo Bakač Erdödy, who defeated the Turks at Sisak in 1593. The Old Town was the Capital of the Varaždin County, and the Erdödy family were its hereditary governors. That’s why their family coat of arms which was officially confirmed by Queen Maria Therese in 1763, is still in use. The last owner of the Town sold it in 1923. The Varaždin City Museum was founded by the Varaždin Museum Society and officially opened in 1925 in a few rooms in the Old Town. Initially, the displays consisted of items donated to the newly opened museum by renowned Varaždin families. Over the years, the size and variety of the Museum Collection have increased, and today the Varaždin City Museum has specialized Archaeological, Historical, Cultural, Ethnographic and Entomological Departments. Museum Departments are housed in several buildings of historical value in the center of the City: the Gothic-Renaissance fortress Old Town, the baroque Sermage, the classical Herzer Palace and the Watchtower in the Old Town complex. The Museum’s Departments currently have four permanent exhibitions including: the Cultural and Historical Department in the Old Town, Entomology in Herzer Palace and the Gallery of Old and Contemporary Masters in the Sermage Palace. The Archaeological and Historical Department in the Herzer Palace is currently being prepared and is almost ready to open permanently.
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Lunca Muresului Natural Park
The Lunca Muresului Natural Park (Floodplain) is a protected area in Romania, downstream of Arad, until to the border with Hungary, along the river Mures, classified as a natural park at the national level and as a terrestrial landscape protected by IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature). It comprises the dammed area of the river Mures, respectively the flood area of dams on either side of the river between high terraces of the same river. Is an area with periodic flooding where the surrounding plants and animals are adapted to this regime. Lunca Muresului Natural Park Natural Park hosts over 200 species of birds. In the forests of the park, we will find deer, wild boar, squirrel and fallow deer.
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Museum of Contemporary Art
In a very modern, architecturally-designed building (which opened in 2009), the Museum of Contemporary Art is home to both its permanent Collection in Motion exhibit and a great selection of temporary exhibits throughout the year
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Cathedral of Zagreb
Zagreb Cathedral was formerly known as St. Stephen’s Cathedral. Today, the Cathedral of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary is dedicated to the Assumption of Mary and to kings Saint Stephen and Saint Ladislaus. Once you get to Kaptol Square you will see it is dominated by Zagreb cathedral which has been there since the 11th century. The Archbishop’s Palace encloses it from three sides, and because of its twin 108 meters (354 ft) high spires, it is the tallest building in Croatia. It literally soars over the city. The Zagreb Cathedral must be seen and its sacristy is of great architectural value. What you will see today does not represent the original construction. The first Cathedral was damaged during the Tartar attack and a great fire in the 13th century. Finally, it was severely damaged by the 1880 earthquake and was restored in the Neo-Gothic style by Hermann Bollé, the cathedral you see today.
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Zrinjevac Park
Zrinjevac Park is a part of Zagreb Lenuci horseshoe. Just south of the central Ban Jelačić Square. It is just a short stroll away. In the park, you may relive Zagreb’s rich history. The centrepiece of the park is the 19th century Music pavilion which serves as an open-air concert stage surrounded by Zagreb institutions. It consists of a 19th-century music pavilion, several fountains, 130 years old weather monitoring station and monuments to famous Croatians: Julije Klović, Andrija Medulić, Fran Krsto Frankopan, Nikola Jurišić, Ivan Kukuljević Sakcinski and Ivan Mažuranić. The park is also home to Zagreb’s first fountain. Designed by Herman Bollé and built-in 1878 the fountain is popularly known as “The Mushroom”.
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Dolac Market
Dolac market nurtures it’s 80+ years old tradition as Zagreb’s main flea or open-air farmers’ market. You will feel the vibe of the town and experience local flavours. Traders from all over Croatia colour the Dolac market with locally grown produce. But be careful there are imported goods as well… At the Dolac market, you will find fresh and local produce. There is a fish market, butcheries, healthy food stands, fresh pasta vendors, bakeries, cheesemongers, flowers, souvenirs, fruit and vegetables. Locals love to buy fresh food at the open-air markets. Basically, every neighbourhood has its own farmers’ market, but the Dolac market is the biggest and the most famous one. The market operates mainly in the morning. Although the official working hours are up until 3 PM, the safest time to visit is until 1 PM.
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Mushroom Museum
Mushroom Museum has up to 1250 species of real mushrooms from around the world. Including dozens of newly discovered species. As a matter of fact, the mushrooms are freeze-dried. Which means they are alive, in their original form, size and colour. Making the Mushroom Museum unique in the world. You have a chance to see the infamous and deadly Amanita phalloides, also known as death cap. They are preserved in their original state so to educate visitors about mushrooms and mycology. In addition, it is about developing ecological awareness. Preserving forests from devastation and overcrowding. It is led by agronomist and greatest authority on mushrooms in Croatia, Professor Romano Bozac, D.Sc. In fact, he can take you around the exhibit, if he has the time.
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Zagreb City Museum
Zagreb City Museum will show you all aspects of the city. Showing Zagreb under the influence of politics, the church, history, economy, town-planning and architecture, the history of art and literature, and everyday life. The Museum building was once the Convent of the Poor Clares and is a historical monument itself. Their most valuable exhibit. The exhibition shows the lifecycle of Zagreb through 45 themes. Built around the artefacts the Museum possesses. You will find a prehistoric settlement constructed in the 7th century BC. Starting with the Hallstatt culture of the Early Iron Age and a house and workshop of the La Tene culture of the Late Iron Age. The archaeological map shows visitors the most important sites and finds in the city!
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Museum of Broken Relationships
The Museum of Broken Relationships is a collection of relationships and in fact an emotional rollercoaster. The first privately owned museum in Zagreb and a winner of the European Museum Kenneth Hudson Award in 2011. It is located in the beautiful baroque Kulmer palace in the Upper Town – a historical part of Zagreb rich in tourist attractions. Conceptualised by Olinka Vištica and Dražen Grubišić, the Museum has toured internationally, amassing an amazing collection and promoting Zagreb. The Museum of Broken Relationships is dedicated to failed relationships. As a matter of fact, it exhibits personal objects, leftover from former owners, accompanied by their stories and emotions. Exhibits hit on a range of emotions and relationships. Reflect on your personal experiences and how they intertwine with the items on display. It makes you think of the value we give to common objects. It is not about the items you will find. Above all else, it is about the incredible experience and emotions you feel as you walk through the exhibition!
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Saint Mark's Church
Saint Mark’s Church is Zagreb’s iconic building due to its signature colourful tiled roof. It is one of the oldest buildings in Zagreb dating from the 13th century. You will notice the Southern portal. It is equally important as it is the richest looking gothic portal in Croatia. The portal consists of 15 sculptures (11 stone gothic sculptures and 4 wooden baroque sculptures) in 11 niches. Sculptures present Virgin Mary with the Child, Christ, St. Mark and the apostles. Saint Mark’s uniquely colourful tiled roof was constructed in 1880 by Friedrich Schmidt and Herman Bollé. On it, you will see the medieval coat of arms of Croatia, Dalmatia and Slavonia on the left side, and the emblem of Zagreb on the right. On the other hand, inside, you will see sculptures by Ivan Meštrović and art by Jozo Kljaković and Ljubo Babić. Eventually, the frescos were renovated, the ceiling was gilded with 22-carat gold leaflets and a new organ has been recently installed.
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Lotrscak Tower
Lotrščak Tower is Zagreb’s fortified tower. It was a part of the southern gate and town defences against the Turks, built in 1266. Today, it is one of the last remaining fortifications and one of Zagreb monuments. But wait – there’s more, inside the Grič cannon fires every day exactly at noon. It has been doing that for the last hundred years, as a commemoration of Zagreb’s victory over the Turks. It has become somewhat a tradition, as locals set their watches according to the shot. The tower was overlooking Zagreb defences for years in the past. As a matter of fact, it got its name by the bell, lat. campana latrunculorum (thief’s bell), which rang every night before the gates closed. Today, it is overlooking Zagreb and offers spectacular views from its top. We highly recommend it to all who can climb its narrow steps.
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Strossmayer Promenade
At Strossmayer promenade you will enjoy spectacular views of Zagreb and rediscover peace and love. It runs along with the remains of Zagreb’s medieval defensive walls. For this reason, it is starting right underneath Lotrščak Tower one of last Zagreb’s fortifications. Watch out for the Noon Grič Cannon shot. Walking along you will stumble upon Anton Gustav Matoš, a Croatian poet who sits on a bench forever overlooking Zagreb. Strossmayer promenade is beautifully green, filled with chestnut trees. Therefore it provides a great gateway during warm summer nights. A great place to take a walk and make a short break from exploring the city. Sit down and watch the world go by!
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Backo Mini Express
Backo Mini Express is an amazing mini-train museum filled with innovation and surprises. Marvel at a very carefully constructed wonderland of trains, skiers, stations and towns. You can get up close and see how it works. Backo Mini Express will overjoy train lovers and children with their models. After six years of work, the scale model is displayed across 75 square metres. It is constantly expanding through innovation and new models. In fact, at the moment it is the largest model in south-eastern Europe. Although the museum is in a single room, they showcase 102 model trains across 1050 m of the railway on 8 levels. They are also featuring a miniature model of the Snow Queen Trophy at Sljeme and an ice skating rink at Tomislav Square. The ski slope is complete with snow, moving skiers, borders and cable railway. It takes some serious engineering and technical innovations to fit all that in. As a matter of fact, they paid attention to the finest detail. Including the scenery which is extraordinary. They thought of everything, including weather control, moving road car models and people engaged in various activities.
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Gric Tunnel
Grič Tunnel was built in 1943, during World War II and connected to Zagreb tunnels. Its primary purpose was to shelter civilians from frequent bombings during WWII and the Croatian War of Independence. After all, it is a part of a network of Zagreb tunnels under the Upper Town. But the only one open to the public! You can find the tunnel entrances as they are marked with Zagreb coat of arms. Once you look at Zagreb coat of arms on the rooftop of St. Marks Church, you will notice the underground, secret door under the castle. Symbolising the entrance to hidden Zagreb network of tunnels. Stories and legends speak of secret underground passages all over the city. One of them speaks of the great 1880 earthquake. When it is said most of the tunnels disappeared, containing the church gold.
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Croatian National Theatre Zagreb
The repertoire is very rich including the world classics, national tradition and contemporary works. As a matter of fact, countless world-famous artists, from ballet dancers to opera singers, have performed on its stage. The opera has an exciting new season. They continue their best works of domestic opera production. It presents contemporary works that will, consequently, position Zagreb as an unavoidable place on the European opera charts. Croatian National Theatre is one of Zagreb’s most elegant and spectacular buildings! It was designed by the renowned Viennese architects Ferdinand Fellner and Herman Helmer. In front of the theatre, you will find The Well of Life, designed by Ivan Meštrović in 1905. Experts claim the statue is among Mestrovic’s finest pieces of art. The Croatian National Theater in Zagreb is one of those things you have to feel and see.