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Alaska State Museum
The Alaska State Museum in the Andrew P. Kashevaroff Building is one of the easiest ways to experience the history, art and culture of the many diverse regions of Alaska. Seasonally changing fine art and historic exhibits augment large, world-class permanent exhibits about the history, art, and cultures of Alaska. Also stop in the historical research center of the State Library and Archives, store, and small café. https://www.traveljuneau.com/listing/alaska-state-museum/43624/
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Downtown Historic District
Klondike-era hotels and saloons, “onion-dome” churches, colorful Victorian homes… Juneau, itself is like one big museum, especially the downtown historic district. https://www.traveljuneau.com/things-to-do/top-attractions/downtown-street-tour/
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Mendenhall Glacier
Mendenhall, one of the most beautiful and accessible glaciers in North America, is just 13 miles from downtown Juneau and a few minutes from the airport. It’s a must-see destination for any Alaska vacation. You won’t believe your ice! A half-mile wide, with ice up to 1,800 feet deep, it’s little wonder this is Juneau’s most popular destination. Whether you’re in town for a day or week, there are many ways to experience the glacier. If you’re on a tight schedule, a trip to the Mendenhall Glacier Visitor Center provides fascinating information as well as excellent views of this ever-changing wonder. While there, be sure to watch a brief film about how the Mendenhall is part of the 1,500-square-mile Juneau Icefield. Take a short trek down Photo Point Trail to a lookout platform for an unobstructed view of the glacier’s face and a perfect photo opportunity. You could do this all in about 90 minutes. https://www.traveljuneau.com/things-to-do/glacier-sightseeing/mendenhall-glacier/
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Juneau Whale Watching
Hop on a boat for a classic Alaska whale watching adventure. At the right time of year, you’re bound to see humpbacks and orcas congregate in the calm waters and put on a show. See them flip their tails above water or breach (when they leap all the way out of the water and then splash back down). With luck, you’ll get the breathtaking sight of bubble net feeding—a unique technique used by humpback whales circling and blowing bubbles to bring fish to the surface of the water when they spontaneously swim upward together. The best time to whale watch is from April to November, when approximately 600 humpbacks inhabit the waters of the northern Inside Passage. Whale watching tours are offered in Juneau and near Glacier Bay. The orca, or killer whale, is also common to Juneau. But our Shamu doesn't jump through hoops like he does at Sea World. These whales, though much smaller than humpbacks, have been known to pursue seals, moose, and even other whales. https://www.traveljuneau.com/things-to-do/whale-watching-wildlife-viewing/
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Tracy Arm Fjord
Forty-five miles outside of Juneau, this scenic destination has it all — mammoth glaciers, towering granite walls, breathtaking mountains, waterfalls, and a large variety of wildlife. Tracy Arm is a 30-mile long fjord — a narrow inlet created by glacial activity — formed thousands of years ago. It winds its way past 7,000-foot snow-capped mountains and floating icebergs. At the end of the fjord lies the stunning Sawyer Glaciers, translucent blue mountains rising majestically out of the water. About once every hour, the North Sawyer and South Sawyer glaciers “calve” — an awe-inspiring phenomena in which large chunks of ice tumble into the sea below. Tracy Arm is also home to a large variety of wildlife including bald eagles, brown bears, goats, and whales. It provides some wonderful opportunities for capturing beautiful vacation memories. https://www.traveljuneau.com/things-to-do/top-attractions/
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Admiralty Island
No trip to Alaska is complete without bears. Just twenty minutes from Juneau by floatplane is Admiralty Island, home to one of the world's highest density brown bear populations. Nicknamed “Fortress of the Bears,” there are approximately 1,600 bears — one for every square mile of the island. The most popular place to see these big, fuzzy creatures in action is Pack Creek Bear Sanctuary. Watch bears feed on salmon during the peak viewing season (July through August). In addition to bear viewing, you might spot seabirds, harbor seals, sea lions, whales, Sitka black-tail deer, or sea otters. The island is also home to the world’s greatest concentration of nesting bald eagles. https://www.traveljuneau.com/things-to-do/whale-watching-wildlife-viewing/admiralty-island-bears/
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Juneau Fishing
Don't be surprised when you see a local calendar marked not with birthdays and anniversary dates, but with tidal schedules and salmon migrations. Fishing is that big of a deal around here. Between the Pacific halibut and five species of Pacific salmon, it's a wonder any work gets done. If fishing in Juneau is on your "to-do" list, you are in luck, because dozens of longtime Alaskans operate Coast Guard licensed charter fishing boats. Full- and half-day charters carry no more than six people at a time to assure lots of rod time for each passenger. There are also local companies that take you on guided fly fishing trips, either in a skiff, on shore, or by hopping a float plane to a remote river or lake. Or you can rent a skiff or charter a vessel to customize your own fishing adventure. https://www.traveljuneau.com/things-to-do/fishing/
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Eaglecrest Ski Area
Eaglecrest Ski Area is Juneau, Alaska’s community owned ski area. Located on Douglas Island just 12 miles from downtown Juneau, Eaglecrest spans over 640 skiable acres of breathtaking terrain serviced by four double chairlifts. The ski area has a vertical drop of 1,620 feet and offers terrain for all ability levels including groomed runs, wide-open bowls, and glades nestled throughout the mountain. Nordic skiing is also available on the area’s groomed Nordic trails. Eaglecrest is Juneau’s Winter Playground and provides skiers and snowboarders a big mountain experience with a small mountain feel. https://www.traveljuneau.com/listing/eaglecrest-ski-area/43597/
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Alaska Wildlife Conservation Center
At the 200-acre Alaska Wildlife Conservation Center, jaws drop in awe-even those of longtime Alaskans who've studied grizzlies and other animals up close. AWCC's mission is to preserve Alaska’s wildlife through conservation, research, education and quality animal care. The center, which opened to the public in 1993, also educates visitors about Alaska's wildlife. Coyotes peer out from behind the brush while a bald eagle swoops in on the salmon remains left by a grizzly bear. Wood Bison plod through 65 acres of tidal flat terrain, as part of a program that will one day restore the species to the Alaskan wilderness. Animals that cannot be released into the wild are given a permanent home at the center. Come be a part of these exciting programs and watch these animals display their natural, “wild”, behaviour. Set on the shores of Turnagain Arm, surrounded by mountains and hanging glaciers, the center is the perfect setting to learn about Alaskan wildlife. The animals are located in different areas grouped around several road loops. Perhaps the best way to view the facility is to first drive around to get your bearings, then park by the gift shop and walk. Each habitat area has a sign explaining the history and habits of the particular animals. https://www.alaska.org/detail/alaska-wildlife-conservation-center
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Crow Creek Historic Gold Mine
Sure, you can pan for gold at hundreds of places in Alaska, but very few of these spots let you really work a claim. But at Crow Creek Mine, less than an hour from Anchorage, you’ll learn how to work a pan, and then how to run a creek-side sluice box. That’s because Crow Creek is an operational mine run by a mining family. Search for gold all day, or tour the historic grounds, once one of Alaska’s largest mines. Set in a picturesque valley high in the Chugach Mountains, the site is like a beautiful outdoor museum, with original buildings—the oldest in the Anchorage municipality—and turn-of-the-century mining equipment. Crow Creek Mine has been in operation since 1896 and the start of the Alaska Gold Rush, at one time mining an astounding 700 ounces a month. World War II brought an end to the large-scale mining, but even today, some say that half of the original deposit is still buried in the ground. The very ground you’ll be mining! https://www.alaska.org/detail/crow-creek-mine#map
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Chugach State Park
The Chugach Mountains create more than a dramatic skyline for Anchorage. They are a playground for outdoor enthusiasts. Combined, Chugach State Park and Chugach National Forest are home to some of the most accessible outdoor adventures in the state. Best of all, some of the top trailheads and access points are just 20 minutes from downtown. Chugach State Park is one of the largest state parks in the nation. To the east of that, Chugach National Forest is the second-largest national forest in the U.S. Together they comprise more than 9,000 square miles of hiking, rafting, biking, ATVing, kayaking and fishing. The most frequently climbed mountain in Alaska, most popular trailheads and more than 60 of the state’s most accessible glaciers are all found in the Chugach. With such a massive range, there are plenty of access points. And ways to enjoy it are as varied as the Chugach landscape. Head north for kayaking on a glacial lake or alpine berry picking. A trip south reveals countless hiking trails tucked into the mountains and amazing glaciers. https://www.anchorage.net/discover/the-chugach/
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Alaska Native Heritage Center
This Anchorage museum offers an in-depth look at Alaskan Native life—with a big focus on Alaska Natives. Watch dancing, listen to stories, meet carvers and explore recreated winter dwellings. The setting is so small and intimate that visitors are sometimes even invited to join the dancers on stage. You'll see how Alaska Native history is not a collection of artefacts behind glass: this is a living, dynamic culture that you can experience firsthand. Of course, you can also see plenty of crafts and handiwork: beautifully adorned moose hide boots, birch bark baskets, and tunics made from seal hide. Outside, you can check out the life-sized traditional native dwellings—like a Supiaq, a semi-subterranean home built by the Alutiiqs to shelter themselves from the harsh Alaskan climate. Or, enter a Southeast Alaska Longhouse—large wooden constructions with no windows and only a smoke hole at the top—that generally housed several families. Inside you will find four beautifully carved posts that each represent a different culture. Each post is carved and painted with a different theme of respect; respect for family, environment, culture, and self. Aside from the beauty of the ornate posts, it is very unique to be able to experience four cultures in one house. https://www.alaska.org/detail/alaska-native-heritage-center
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Alaska Botanical Garden
A trip to the Alaska Botanical Garden will dispel any thoughts you might have that Alaska’s harsh climate allows only a few hardy species of plants and trees to grow. Step into this wonderland and you’ll be amazed to see the lushness and variety of species that thrive here. Explore the hardy perennials that flourish in Southeast Alaska, like poppies, iris, Asiatic lilies, and roses. Walk through the rock garden, with its 350-plus species of alpine plants. Check out the herb garden, where you can ask volunteers questions when they’re around, and get a sense of Alaskan history in the Anchorage Heritage Garden, a recreation of an old-style local garden where you can see vegetables, annuals, and perennials that were typically grown here in the first half of the 20th century. The produce grown is donated to local food banks. http://www.alaska.org/detail/alaska-botanical-garden
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Alaska Zoo
The Alaska Zoo started in 1969 with one baby elephant named Annabelle that was won in a contest. Since then, it has expanded to include 100 animals across 25 acres of the Anchorage hillside. The zoo has the widest variety of animals native to the state of Alaska as well as a handful of exotics that are part of a great center for education and research that focuses on wildlife conservation and animal rehabilitation. For 50 years, the zoo has been a nonprofit organization serving the wildlife and people of Alaska, as well as visitors to our state. We rely on admissions, donations, gift shop sales, coffee shop purchases and memberships to operate and care for the animals as we receive no city or state funding. The wooded hillside setting allows visitors to get close-up views of the many animals of the north along the naturally wooded boreal forest with gravel pathways. The staff takes pride in maintaining a natural setting for both zoo animals and visitors. https://www.alaska.org/detail/alaska-zoo
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Alaska Jewish Museum
Homesteaders. Entrepreneurs. Photographers. This petite, but very well-done museum in midtown Anchorage offers engaging proof of how the state of Alaska has been shaped - and is still being shaped - by a diverse community. It's open 1 pm - 6 pm Sunday through Thursday year-round (closed Friday and Saturday for the Jewish Sabbath). It takes only 15 minutes to see the exhibits, but you can also watch a 90-minute video about Warren Metzker, a legend of Alaska aviation who captained the Jewish airlift of Yemenite Jews to the newly-created state of Israel. Launched in the summer of 2013, the Alaska Jewish Museum was the brainchild of a group of Alaskans, led by Rabbi Joseph Greenberg of Anchorage’s Alaska Jewish Campus, who wanted to explore the Jewish history and culture that had made an impact on the state of Alaska - as well as the Alaskans who have made an impact on the larger Jewish community. They began by creating and partnering with various exhibits—for example, a 2013 exhibit hosted by the Anchorage Museum of Art about the work of Ruth Gruber. Though not an Alaska native herself, Gruber is a respected Jewish photojournalist who documented the early days of modern Israel and also spent time in Alaska decades ago, capturing valuable images of features and terrain that simply don’t exist anymore. https://www.alaska.org/detail/alaska-jewish-museum
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Wells Fargo Museum
This museum in downtown Anchorage may house artefacts that are hundreds of years old, but its high-calibre collection—and its solid connection to the community—makes it feel like a living museum. Even though the art-gallery-sized space feels intimate, this is the largest private collection of its kind in Alaska. The museum was started by the First National Bank of Alaska in 1976, as a way for the bank’s owners, the Rasmussen family, to create a space for high-quality art and artefacts largely from Alaska's native tribes, such as the Northwest Coast Indian, Athabascan, Aleut, Yupik and Inupiaq tribes. Wells Fargo bought the museum in 2000 and has its own piece of Alaska history to share: the bank and delivery service used to ship gold out from the Klondike during the gold-rush days of the late 1800s and early 1900s, while also bringing in both miners and materials. To date, the museum’s collection now has about 6,000 artefacts and works of art, as well as 4,000 books, in museum branches around the state; this Anchorage flagship, though, has 900 pieces on display, including traditional clothing, a collection of historic Alaskan business tokens, a Bering Sea kayak covered in traditional seal skin, and paintings by such famed Alaskan artists as Sydney Laurence, Fred Machetanz and Eustace Ziegler. https://www.alaska.org/detail/alaska-heritage-museum-at-wells-fargo
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Anchorage Museum
Alaska's largest museum, the Anchorage Museum tells the real story of the North. The twisting story, the unsuspected story, the many-faceted story- a story that weaves together social, political, cultural, scientific, historic and artistic threads. Explore the full diversity of Alaska Native cultures, including masterworks of Alaska Native art and design from the collections of the Smithsonian Institution. The Art of the North galleries in the museum’s new wing present the museum’s art collection from the perspectives of American art and an international North. Paintings, sculpture, photography, video and other media offer varied perceptions of the Northern landscape and wilderness through historical and contemporary depictions of both land and people. The new Alaska Exhibition tells the story of Alaska through multiple voices and perspectives reflecting the ingenuity, technology, ways of knowing and intimate understanding of the landscape that have allowed people to survive and thrive across the North. The exhibition is organized by 13 themes reflecting essential aspects of life in Alaska, both today and throughout the state’s rich history. These themes reveal the identity of Alaska and its people. Discover Alaska and the Arctic through science. In the 11,000-square-foot Discovery Center, visitors of all ages are introduced to Alaska and the Arctic through technology, interactive installations, artwork, marine-life tanks and more. Space is divided into several distinct areas, each providing an opportunity to learn about our Northern environment. https://www.anchorage.net/listings/anchorage-museum/36698/
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The Alaska Experience Theatre
Located in the historic 4th Avenue Market Place in downtown Anchorage, the Alaska Experience Theatre’s Earthquake Exhibit and Safe-Quake Theatre experience take you back in time to 1964 on the fateful Good Friday when North America recorded it largest earthquake ever at a magnitude of 9.2. https://www.anchorage.net/listings/alaska-experience-theatre/39062/
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Oscar Anderson House Museum
What was it like for a family living in Anchorage in 1915? The Oscar Anderson House Museum, located in Elderberry Park at 5th Avenue and M Street, is the perfect way to find out. Oscar Anderson played a large role in the development of early Anchorage, and his house was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1978. The restoration took place between 1978-1982 with help from the Anderson Family, and particularly their daughter Ruth. The interior was intricately restored to represent its earliest décor. The Museum was opened to the public in the early 1980s and has provided Alaskans and visitors with a chance to experience life in early Anchorage for over 30 years. Tours are available by appointment and regularly from Memorial Day weekend through Labor Day weekend. Or come visit during Swedish Christmas, the first two weekends each December, when the house is elaborately decorated and special Swedish treats are available. https://www.alaska.org/detail/oscar-anderson-house
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Alaska Aviation Museum
One of the top 5 attractions in Anchorage, the Alaska Aviation Museum is special. Each aircraft and artefact holds a fascinating, relevant, meaningful Alaska history back story. As a state with few transportation options over a vast territory, aviation developed a rich and textured legacy. The Alaska Aviation Museum is located on the world’s busiest seaplane base, Lake Hood, at Anchorage International Airport. Open daily 9 am-5 pm during the summer, it’s a substantial museum boasting 4 hangars of exhibits and vintage aircraft (over 25 vintage aircraft in flying condition on display). (Follow website or Facebook for winter hours.) Outdoor exhibits; Restoration hangar (watch volunteers at work restoring vintage aircraft); Control tower (watch seaplanes land and take off, including live real-time radio tower feed); Flight simulators, including full-immersion virtual reality; World-class gift store. Allow 1½ to 2 hours for a visit. https://www.anchorage.net/listings/alaska-aviation-museum/35730/
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Capilano Suspension Bridge Park
Appreciate nature from three breathtaking perspectives - Capilano Suspension Bridge, Treetops Adventure and the exciting new Cliffwalk. The 450 ft (137m) long, 230 ft (70m) high Capilano Suspension Bridge has thrilled visitors since 1889. While the wobbly bridge and stunning location is a Vancouver landmark, Capilano Suspension Bridge Park offers an all-encompassing BC experience. History, culture and nature are presented in unique and thrilling ways with knowledgeable staff and interpretive signage providing as much, or as little, information as guests want. 1890's costumed staff provides entertainment, conducts guided tours through the Story Centre and eco-tours in the rainforest. Guests interact with First nations staff either at the Big House or in the rainforest. Capilano Suspension Bridge Park has the world's largest private collection of totem poles, including early 1900's local Coast Salish in the Totem Park and Haida, Tsimshian and Tlingit poles that have been carved on-site over the past 20 years in Kia'palano. The 100 year-old Trading Post, which retains its early 1900s mercantile flavour, sells Canadian gifts and take home memories. Seasonal events like Raptors Ridge birds of prey June to October and Canyon Lights in December enhance the many experiences at this year-round destination. https://www.tourismvancouver.com/listings/capilano-suspension-bridge-park/17604/
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The Museum of Anthropology
Just 20 minutes from downtown Vancouver and the Vancouver International Airport, the Museum of Anthropology at UBC houses one of the world’s finest displays of Northwest Coast First Nations arts in a spectacular Arthur Erickson designed building overlooking mountains and sea. See magnificent carvings, weavings and contemporary artworks inside the soaring glass and concrete structure of the Museum’s Great Hall. Admire the world’s largest collection of works by acclaimed Haida artist Bill Reid, including his famous cedar sculpture The Raven and the First Men. Explore the Museum’s Multiversity Galleries where more than 9,000 objects from around the world are displayed. Visit the award-winning Koerner Ceramics Gallery, displaying a collection of European ceramics unique to North America. Stroll the Museum’s grounds, where monumental Haida houses, poles and Musqueam house posts capture the dramatic beauty of traditional Northwest Coast architecture and design. Enjoy a wide range of special exhibitions and public programs, including free guided gallery walks, visit the MOA Shop and relax in Café MOA. https://www.tourismvancouver.com/listings/museum-of-anthropology-at-ubc/17853/
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Stanley Park
Welcome to Stanley Park, Vancouver's first, largest, and most beloved urban park! Designated a national historic site of Canada, Stanley Park is a magnificent green oasis in the midst of the heavily built urban landscape of Vancouver. Explore the 400-hectare natural West Coast rainforest and enjoy scenic views of water, mountains, sky, and majestic trees along Stanley Park's famous Seawall. Discover kilometres of trails, beautiful beaches, local wildlife, great eats, natural, cultural and historical landmarks, along with many other adventures. The park offers a wide range of unforgettable experiences for all ages and interests, including Canada’s largest aquarium. http://vancouver.ca/parks-recreation-culture/stanley-park.aspx
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Jericho Arts Centre (JAC)
Jericho Arts Centre (JAC) is a 135-seat performance venue located off NW Marine Drive near Jericho Beach in the heart of Vancouver’s West Side. It is operated by the Friends of Jericho Arts Centre Society (FoJACS), a non-profit society made up of the users and volunteers who work on JAC. FoJACS leases JAC from the Vancouver Board of Parks and Recreation. http://www.jerichoartscentre.com/
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Malkin Bowl
Malkin Bowl is the outdoor performance stage in Stanley Park and has hosted Canadian musicians such as Broken Social Scene, Blue Rodeo, and The Tragically Hip. Malkin Bowl is located in Stanley Park. The entrance to Malkin Bowl is opposite to the Stanley Park Pavilion. http://vancouver.ca/parks-recreation-culture/malkin-bowl.aspx
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Native American Totem Poles
The First Nations Totem Poles in Stanley Park in Vancouver, British Columbia are the most visited attraction in Vancouver, British Columbia, and possibly all of Canada! There are a number of beautiful totem poles in Stanley Park at 2 different locations within the park. http://stanleyparkvan.com/stanley-park-van-attractions-totem-poles.html
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Canada Place
Located in the heart of Vancouver’s downtown harbourfront, Canada Place is an iconic national landmark welcoming local residents, visitors and ships to the West Coast. Canada Place is a multi-use facility that includes FlyOver Canada, Vancouver Convention Centre East, Pan Pacific Hotel, Port Metro Vancouver cruise ship terminal, World Trade Centre office tower and VINCI Park parkade. Canada Place hosts Canada Day at Canada Place, the largest Canada Day celebration outside of Ottawa, and well as a number of other community events including National Aboriginal Day, the Canada Place Summer Series and Christmas at Canada Place. https://www.tourismvancouver.com/listings/canada-place/18115/
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Vancouver Lookout
Where else can you enjoy a 360º aerial view of Vancouver, “the most beautiful city in the world”? Start your Vancouver adventure here, with a 40-second glass elevator ride, whisking you 553.16 ft (168.60 m) skyward to our panoramic observation deck. Enjoy intimate views of cosmopolitan Vancouver, historic Gastown and bustling Coal Harbour. Look beyond for enchanting views of our stunning natural landscape including world famous Stanley Park, the Pacific Ocean, the majestic North Shore Mountains and the Olympic Peninsula Mountains. Past. Present. Future. Multi-lingual guest service members provide complimentary guided tours with fascinating facts about Vancouver’s history, infrastructure, local community, current trends and future expansion. Or explore at your own pace and read our interpretive displays. Test yourself and try to identify unique Vancouver attractions and landmarks. http://vancouverlookout.com/
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Carnarvon Park
Carnarvon Park offers many recreation opportunities, from a multitude of sports fields to a fitness circuit and a children’s playground. The dappled shade of the tree-lined walks makes for a very enjoyable stroll, with a diversity of trees that include ash, plum, crabapple, and hornbeam. This park was first assembled by the Point Grey Municipality prior to the City of Vancouver amalgamation in 1929. It was secured by tax sales from the B.C. Government. The Park is named for one of its bounding streets which in turn is named for the Earl of Carnarvon who was Britain’s Secretary of State and introduced the British North America Act thereby bringing into confederation the Canadian provinces. https://covapp.vancouver.ca/ParkFinder/parkdetail.aspx?inparkid=2
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Gastown
Gastown is an historical part of Vancouver's downtown and was rejuvenated in the 1970's. Today it gives visitors a glimpse of what Vancouver would have been like a century ago with its cobbled streets, lined with shops and restaurants. A popular attraction here is the Gastown Steam Clock. http://gastown.org/
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Granville Island
In the 1970’s, Granville Island began its successful transformation from an industrial wasteland to one of the most beloved public spaces in Vancouver. As Vancouver’s premier artistic and cultural hub, located in an urban, waterfront location and steeped in a rich industrial and maritime heritage, this unique destination attracts millions of visitors each year from Vancouver and around the world. The charm of Granville Island lies in its unexpected mix of uses. The famous Public Market, open daily from 9 am to 7 pm, is home to more than 50 independent food purveyors and contributes to the Island’s appeal as a renowned culinary destination. In the Net Loft Shops and Railspur District, many of Canada’s best artists and designers can be found. Granville Island is home to many cultural venues and hosts numerous performing arts and cultural festivals year-round. https://granvilleisland.com/
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Vancouver's Chinatown
If you’re interested in Oriental architecture and gardens, a visit to the second largest Chinatown in North America is recommended. Dr. Sun Yat Sen Chinese Garden is a beautiful and peaceful oasis away from the hustle and bustle of the city. http://vancouver-chinatown.com/
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Quilchena Park
Quilchena’s wide green fields are welcoming to sports enthusiasts and those looking for a pleasant stroll alike. Majestic poplars tower over the rolling lawns and shelter the seating areas below. Originally owned by the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR), the CPR leased this land (40 acres in total) to the Quilchena Golf Club. The word “Quilchena” means “flat place near the water” in the local First Nations language. On February 11, 1956, following the expiration of the CPR’s lease with the golf course, the Park Board purchased the eastern area of the course for park purposes and this site was designated Quilchena Park. The western portion of the golf course became Prince of Wales Secondary School. Park development began on January 22, 1962. https://covapp.vancouver.ca/ParkFinder/parkdetail.aspx?inparkid=6
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Hastings Park
Hastings Park now has more unique features than ever! There's lots to enjoy and discover: recreational activities, park spaces, gardens, playground, and sport fields, mixed with an amusement park, horse race trace, and large sport and entertainment venues. Explore the ecologically rich green space at Hastings Park, featuring spectacular gardens and the Miracle Mile statue. This Italian-styled garden features fountains surrounded by whimsical sculptures inspired by famous Italian operas. Pear trees and plantings of lavender and Italian cypress add to the Mediterranean feel. A large children's play area is adjacent to the garden. http://vancouver.ca/parks-recreation-culture/hastings-park.aspx
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VanDusen Botanical Garden
VanDusen Botanical Garden is a 55-acre oasis in the heart of Vancouver with over 7,500 plant species and varieties from around the world! Spot and photograph local wildlife, find your way through an Elizabethan hedge maze, unwind in a serene setting, dine on the patios of Truffles Cafe or Shaughnessy Restaurant, or browse the garden-themed gift shop. VanDusen has something for everyone to enjoy! http://vandusengarden.org/
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Bloedel Conservatory
Bloedel Conservatory is a domed lush paradise located in Queen Elizabeth Park atop the City of Vancouver’s highest point. More than 120 free-flying exotic birds, 500 exotic plants and flowers thrive within its temperature-controlled environment. Constructed through a very generous donation from Prentice Bloedel, Bloedel was dedicated at its opening in 1969 “to a better appreciation and understanding of the world of plants." Designated as a heritage building, it is jointly operated by Vancouver Park Board and the Vancouver Botanical Garden Association. Together, these partners also operate VanDusen Botanical Garden. http://vancouver.ca/parks-recreation-culture/bloedel-conservatory.aspx
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Queen Elizabeth Park
Queen Elizabeth Park, Vancouver’s horticultural jewel, is a major draw for floral display enthusiasts and view-seekers, and as a popular backdrop for wedding photos. At 152 metres above sea level, it’s the highest point in Vancouver and makes for spectacular views of the park, city, and mountains on the North Shore. The 52-hectare park is home to the stunning Bloedel Conservatory. There is also a gorgeously landscaped quarry garden, the arboretum with its collection of exotic and native trees, sculptures including one by internationally renowned artist Henry Moore, and diverse recreational offerings such as tennis, lawn bowling and pitch & putt. The park is also the perfect setting for fine dining at Seasons in the Park, a picnic or stargazing! http://vancouver.ca/parks-recreation-culture/queen-elizabeth-park.aspx
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The Butchart Gardens
Come enjoy our breathtaking 22 ha (55 acres) of gardens year around. In Spring, countless tulips, daffodils and hyacinths will give you a buffet of fragrances and colours. You’ll be saying “wow” when you experience our Summer: The Rose Garden, evening entertainment, subtle night illuminations, the Saturday firework show, and boat tours to name a few of the delights. In Winter, Colourful lights, carollers, ice skating and festive fayre — Christmas is a cheerful time of year at The Gardens. Bundle up and stroll through the Twelve Days of Christmas display, sing along to the sounds of the season with Traditional Carollers or listen to the Festive Brass, then stop in at the Coffee Shop to warm up with a hot chocolate and gingerbread by the fire. https://www.tourismvictoria.com/see-do/activities-attractions/attractions/butchart-gardens
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Fisherman
Just around the corner from Victoria's Inner Harbour, Fisherman's Wharf is a hidden treasure waiting to be discovered. With a brand new park offering an area for kids to play or for adults to read a book, this unique marine destination offers food kiosks, unique shops and eco-tour adventures in a working harbour setting. Wander down to the docks with your lunch, buy seafood fresh off the boat, check out the unique array of commercial, pleasure vessel and float home moorage and watch the commercial fishing vessels unload their wares. https://www.tourismvictoria.com/see-do/activities-attractions/garden-parks/fishermans-wharf
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British Columbia Parliament Buildings
Overlooking Victoria's majestic Inner Harbour, the Parliament Buildings are open to the public year-round. Visitors are invited to discover the architectural splendour of the Parliament Buildings and learn about British Columbia's Legislative Assembly. The Parliament Buildings are open to the public from Monday to Friday between the hours of 8:30 am to 4:30 pm. Visitors are welcome to join one of the regularly-scheduled guided tours or to explore the buildings on their own self-guided tour. During the busy summer season, the Parliament Buildings are open for tours seven days a week, including statutory holidays. https://www.tourismvictoria.com/see-do/activities-attractions/attractions/british-columbia-parliament-buildings
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Royal BC Museum
See all of British Columbia at the Royal BC Museum, a world-class museum of natural and human history. Explore our core galleries and immerse yourself in tales of where we've been and where we are going. Discover things and people you never knew before. Marvel at the totems, masks and cultural treasures featured in the world-class First Peoples Gallery. Experience authentic artifacts and highly realistic settings -- from the Woolly Mammoth in his rocky, icy world to a tar-scented trip on the HMS Discovery. Your experience doesn't end with Museum's galleries. https://www.tourismvictoria.com/see-do/activities-attractions/attractions/royal-bc-museum