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Halifax Central Library
The Central Library appeals to not only bibliophiles but also serves as a community meeting space, a place to grab coffee and a theatre for live readings, music and films. Also the Halifax Central Library is a leader in sustainability, aiming to achieve the gold level LEED certification. The green roof is perhaps one of the most noticeable sustainable features, aiding in the harvesting of rainwater for use in the flush fixtures throughout the building. Behind the scenes, “at a minimum, 50% of all wood used in the construction of the library is certified by the Forest Stewardship Council as sustainably grown and harvested.” While the library space itself is beautiful, the inside of the building has a hard time competing with the views of the city. Head up to the fourth floor (maybe grab a Pavia coffee and cookie while you’re up there?) and check out the panoramic views of the city.
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Nova Scotia Museum of Natural History
What’s bigger, you or a blue whale’s rib bone? Can you tell the difference between a drone bee and a worker bee? How old do you think Gus the tortoise is? Discover the answer to these questions and more as you explore the wonders of Nova Scotia’s land and sea at the Museum of Natural History in Halifax. See ancient fossils, glittering gold, stunning Mi’kmaq artifacts, sea creatures from an ocean tide pool, deadly mushrooms, frogs and snakes and whale skeletons. Our live displays include in-house bee colony; butterfly house; and nature centre with a variety of critters. From an eagle’s nest to the ocean floor, there’s something for everyone. A special exhibition area features changing displays from local, national and international sources. Our museum gift shop offers a variety of unique items for all nature lovers.
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McNabs Island
McNabs Island is the largest island at the entrance of Halifax Harbour in Nova Scotia. Part of the McNabs and Lawlor Islands Provincial Park, McNabs Island is only a short boat ride from Halifax or Eastern Passage, but feels like a world away with its colorful past and unspoiled natural beauty. Situated on the eastern side of the entrance to Halifax Harbour, McNabs Island has provided a scenic and historic backdrop to the lives of metro residents for over two centuries. Its strategic location was utilized by the military to guard the harbour, her fertile soils provided an important source of food for early settlers, and the beaches, woodlands, open fields and scenery have attracted local residents for leisure-time pursuits since the 1700's. McNabs Island is accessible by private boat, or commercial water taxi and charter boat operators from Halifax, Dartmouth and Eastern Passage. Depending on pick-up and drop-off locations, the trip takes about 20-30 minutes from downtown Halifax or Dartmouth, and 10 minutes from Eastern Passage.
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Halifax Citadel National Historic Site
The Halifax Citadel is a must-see stop on any itinerary when visiting Halifax. Majestically set upon an expansive hill overlooking the city, it is part of a series of forts – each one showcasing changes over time to its defenses, each significantly different than its predecessor – that protected Halifax Harbour from 1749 to 1906. It was so strategically important that it was rebuilt three times yet it was never once attacked. Today, this historic fort offers a fascinating window into our colonial past. Spend time exploring the Halifax Citadel’s grounds and meticulously recreated period rooms, including the barracks, tailor shop and school. Even join the 78th Highlanders in their period uniforms for the day and see if you are up for the job of keeping Halifax safe from enemy attack. Heft a soldier’s knapsack in the barracks, stand in awe as the Royal Artillery command the firing of the noon gun, and ask a soldier what garrison life in the Halifax Citadel was really like.
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Halifax Public Gardens
As one of the finest surviving examples of a Victorian Garden in North America, the Halifax Public Gardens is located in the heart of Halifax. Located on 17-acres and enclosed by a wrought-iron fence with a magnificent set of ornamental gates, take a leisurely stroll through the gardens to view many floral displays that include exotic and semi-tropical ornamental species, trees, shrubs, statues, and fountains. In 1874, the city of Halifax assumed responsibility for the original garden (N.S. Horticultural Society, 1836) and a civic garden (1867); the gardens were brought together by the present design in 1875. Richard Power, the Garden’s superintendent from 1872–1915, oversaw the introduction of the bandstand, fountains, statues, and wrought iron gates – all features of the High Victorian Pleasure Garden. Each piece honoured a milestone in Queen Victoria’s reign, a contemporary military event, or an important local personage. Recognized as a National Historic Site in 1984, the Halifax Public Gardens are a much loved and popular destination for locals and visitors alike. From mid-June to mid-September, the bandstand features afternoon band concerts.
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Aux Trois Couvents
This interpretation centre is located at the historical and archeological site of the Château-Richer convents. Visit the permanent exhibitions on the history of one of the first French settlements in North America. Attractions also include the excavated foundations of the first two convents (built in 1694 and 1830), the reconstruction of a classroom from 1912 and temporary exhibitions on the cultural identity of the Côte-de-Beaupré. Do not forget to enjoy a delicious beverage in our coffee shop before leaving!
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Parc de la Chute-Montmorency
Open year-round, beautiful Montmorency Falls Park is just a few minutes from downtown Québec City. The waterfalls are 83 m (272') tall, a full 30 m (99') higher than Niagara Falls. Take the cable car up the cliff to start the panoramic walking tour at the Manor, where are housed an interpretation centre, gift shop and restaurant. Follow the footpath along the top of the cliff to the suspended bridge, which affords a splendid view of the area. Keep walking along the path until you get to the 487-step staircase down the side of the cliff that will bring you to the foot of the falls. There are also three via ferrata routes near the falls, along with a 300-m (984.3’) double zip line.
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Petit Champlain District
Rue du Petit-Champlain, one of the oldest commercial streets in North America, is lined with one-of-a-kind boutiques and restaurants. The Petit-Champlain district isn’t just illuminated for the holidays—it stays decorated all winter long, much to everyone’s delight. It’s the ideal place to bundle up for a winter evening stroll in an enchanting atmosphere straight out of a Christmas fairy tale. The French influence is evident everywhere you look in Place Royale and along Rue du Petit-Champlain. The two—and three—storey plastered stone homes with their dormer windows, gabled roofs, large chimneys and firewalls rising above the rooftops make it hard to believe you’re not in France.
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Musee De La Civilisation
The most popular museum in Québec City. A visitor-oriented museum with a participatory and interactive approach for stimulating wonderment and encouraging discovery. Magnificent exhibits of international calibre about Québec culture and history. Take part in the family workshops on current, historical or sometimes unusual topics. Guided tours available for some exhibits.
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Fairmont Le Chateau Frontenac
More than a hotel, the Fairmont Le Château Frontenac is a Québec City icon. For over a century, it has perched atop Cape Diamond overlooking Dufferin Terrace and the St. Lawrence River. You can come inside and admire the recently renovated lobby along with historical artifacts going back 400 years displayed in specially designed cases. The Château was the brainchild of William Van Horne, president of the Canadian Pacific Railway, who wanted to build a hotel to draw travellers as a way to promote luxury train travel. Many famous people have made the Château Frontenac their residence during their time in Québec City. From Queen Elizabeth II to Céline Dion, via Princess Grace of Monaco, Leonardo DiCaprio, Paul McCartney and Charlie Chaplin, celebrities have made the Château Frontenac their home away from home.
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Musee du Fort
Through a 30-minute sound and light show, travel back in time to the foundation of Québec to revisit the six military sieges that shaped its history! This exciting historical period is brought to life with an impressive model of the city circa 1750. Located in the heart of Old Québec, start your visit to Québec City with a bang at the Musée du Fort!
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Old Quebec
A UNESCO World Heritage treasure, Old Québec is the only fortified city north of Mexico. Bask in the European charm as you stroll through the old quarters and take in over 400 years of history in the birthplace of French North America.
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Le Monastere des Augustines
Located in Old Québec, the Monastère des Augustines occupies the historic wings of the Hôtel-Dieu de Québec monastery (1639), the site of the first hospital on the continent, north of Mexico. The onsite museum has 1000 items from its collection of 40 000 artefacts on display. The exhibition traces the history of the Augustinian Sisters, their social involvement and their work caring for the sick, as well the evolution of medicine through the ages.
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Rue Saint Jean
A stroll along rue Saint-Jean is a must for anyone visiting Québec City. Starting from centrally located Place D’Youville, a string of boutiques, restaurants, churches, and historic buildings create a unique and eclectic ambiance. And when the street is closed to traffic in summer, pedestrians take over and a festive atmosphere reigns. Religion, politics, and education converge at Place de l’Hôtel-de-Ville, home to City Hall and just steps from Notre-Dame de Québec Cathedral-Basilica and the historic Séminaire de Québec. In summer, you can watch the performances of the public entertainers while the charming wooden kiosks of the German Christmas Market settle there from late November to end of December. The ice rink at Place D'Youville is the perfect place to experience Québec City's winter. From mid-November, put on skates and enjoy its magical atmosphere!
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Erico Chocolaterie Patisserie
A creative chocolate shop and a quaint small chocolate museum. Learn about the history of chocolate from Mayan times to this day. Ancient and modern accessories, chocolate-making techniques (video and view on the kitchen), and more. For chocolate lovers: little pieces of chocolate, a handmade selection of pure original chocolate bars cookies, brownies, cupcakes, cakes and hot chocolates. Summer: homemade ice cream dipped in chocolate, yogourt and sherbet.
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Saint-Roch District
Over $500 million was invested in Québec City's new downtown core, the revitalized Saint-Roch district. The spirit of innovation fostered by Saint-Roch makes it the hub of the Greater Québec Area. The many avant-garde businesses, shops and restaurants, local breweries, bars found here create a vibrant atmosphere that appeals to local residents and visitors alike. Saint-Roch owes its distinctive flair to its cultural, commercial and artistic vitality that rivals that of the greatest North American metropolises. Over 130 shops! In summer, young professionals from the web and video game industries blend in with the student crowd looking for a place to eat outside in Jardin Jean-Paul-L’Allier, a real oasis of greenery in the heart of the city. In winter, Saint-Roch is illuminated by a 15-metre Christmas tree; simply magical!
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Art District Montcalm
A perfect balance between bourgeois and bohemian, the Montcalm neighbourhood attracts epicureans, sports fans, and art and culture lovers in a magnificent historical environment. Head to the Upper Town for a highly entertaining and tasty experience! Stroll down avenue Cartier in the heart of the Art District and you’ll pass a hundred or so places of business. Enjoy the lively atmosphere, gourmet food shops, and fashionable and specialty boutiques of this less-touristy area. Bookstores, theatre, museums, movies, art galleries: in Montcalm there's something for culture lovers of every stripe. Don't forget to visit the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec (MNBAQ), a real architectural gem showcasing both Québec and international art. To keep up with the latest films, head to Cinéma Cartier, the only movie theatre downtown; it can get pretty busy on weekends.
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Maison Hamel-Bruneau
This charming house has been transformed into a centre for the arts and science, with a focus on stimulating debate and the exchange of ideas. It hosts exhibits dealing with a range of topics, including current events. The program comprises a number of cultural activities and exhibitions about famous contemporary artists.
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Fleur de Lys Centre Commercial
One of the largest malls in the Québec City area, with 200 stores and services including such major banners as Walmart, Maxi, Urban Planet, Sears, The Bay, Sports Experts, Mode Choc and Jysk. A must for any shopping expedition, Fleur de Lys is strategically located less than 5 minutes from downtown. Close to all highways and several major development projects, and next to the Videotron Centre.
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Huron-Wendat Museum
The Huron-Wendat Museum presents one of the rarest collections emphasizing the wealth of the culture and the know-how of the Huron-Wendat. The Museum shares the same entrance as the Hôtel-Musée Premières Nations.
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Harpoon Brewery
Our beer hall is a premier Boston venue overlooking our brewery production and the city skyline. We can host evening events for up to 400 guests and have a unique, semi-private daytime event space for up to 70 guests. Our space is a great option for corporate, social, alumni events, fundraisers and private parties with catering and brewery tours available.
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New England Aquarium
The New England Aquarium in Boston is located right on Boston's scenic waterfront. Colorful & educational exhibits feature more than 8,000 aquatic creatures, including the playful penguin pool. A unique central tank as the main attraction complete with small sharks, many varieties of fish and a huge sea turtle. The Trust Family Foundation Shark and Ray Touch Tank features sharks and rays in a 25,000-gallon tank surrounded by shallow edges and viewing windows, allowing visitors to experience a close encounter with these animals. This beautiful space replicates a large mangrove area. The rays glide around the tank where visitors have the opportunity to reach right in and touch these graceful creatures. The Aquarium also runs a Whale Watch in Boston Harbor from April through October. Their high-speed catamaran takes participants to Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary - the only whale feeding sanctuary in the United States!
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Faneuil Hall Marketplace
Over 70 retailers and 40 office tenants occupy the 200,000 square feet of retail and 160,000 square feet of space on Boston’s iconic mixed use festival marketplace. Customers enjoy unique, locally loved, and nationally recognized shops while indulging in the worldwide cuisine at our restaurants, pubs, and in the world-famous Quincy Market Colonnade. The cobblestone promenades are filled with the music and jaw-dropping routines of world-renowned street performers and musicians. Faneuil Hall Marketplace is at the top of the list of things to see in Boston!
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Boston Fire Museum
The mission of the Museum is to preserve and display fire fighting memorabilia from the Greater Boston area, educate and inform the general public on fire safety, maintain our home in the historic Congress Street Fire Station, and to support the fire service in general. The Boston Fire Museum has occupied the old firehouse at 344 Congress St in Boston’s seaport district since 1983. The Museum Committee, which oversees the operation of the Museum, is an all-volunteer group dedicated to informing friends and visitors about the history of fire fighting. Since the Boston Fire Department is one of the oldest in the nation, there is a rich tradition to salute. The home of our parent group, the Boston Sparks Association, is on the second floor. Our museum collection comprises fire alarm displays and artefacts, firefighting equipment, antique fire apparatus, and photographs.
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Boston Children's Museum
For 100 years, Boston Children's Museum has been a leader in Boston and within the museum community worldwide. The Museum is a private, non-profit, educational institution that is recognized internationally as a research and development center and pacesetter for children's exhibitions, educational programs and curriculum. Designed for children and families, our exhibits focus on science, culture, environmental awareness, health & fitness, and the arts. In addition to extensive child-centered exhibits, Museum educators develop programs and activities that address literacy, performing arts, science and math, visual arts, cultures, and health and wellness. The Museum is also one of the few children's museums in the world to maintain a collection, with more than 50,000 items.
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Boston Tea Party Ships & Museum
At the Boston Tea Party Ships & Museum, you can be a part of the famous event that forever changed the course of American history through a multi-sensory experience that includes live actors, interactive exhibits, and full-scale replica 18th-century sailing vessels! Enter the Meeting House and step back in time to rebellious 1773 Boston and meet Samuel Adams and your 18th century host! Discover what role you will play in the “single most important event leading up to the American Revolution” – the Boston Tea Party – as you take part in the colonial town meeting. Experience life at sea aboard an 18th-century sailing vessel as you join a Son of Liberty and take part in the “Destruction of the Tea”! Throw tea into the very same body of water where the Boston Tea Party took place over 240 years ago.
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Legoland Discovery Center Boston
LEGOLAND Discovery Center Boston is a new, indoor attraction, for children between 3 to 10 years old and their families. The interactive experience includes rides, a 4D cinema, Master Model Builder workshops and more! You can also see iconic attractions from Boston and surrounding areas in MINILAND. While all adults must be accompanied by a child, there are Adult Nights every month.
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Museum of African American History
The Museum of African American History is New England’s largest museum dedicated to preserving, conserving and interpreting the contributions of African Americans. In Boston and Nantucket, the Museum has preserved four historic sites and two Black Heritage Trails® that tell the story of organized black communities from the Colonial Period through the 19th century.
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Freedom Trail
The famous Freedom Trail is a 2.5 mile red-brick trail through Boston’s historic neighborhoods that tells the story of the American Revolution. From the Old North Church to Faneuil Hall, and through resonant burying grounds, visit the temples and landmarks of the Revolutionary Era.
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Boston Public Garden
The Boston Public Garden is one of the most popular tourist attractions in downtown Boston, for more reasons than just offering free admission to the public. It is a family and couple friendly park that allows visitors to absorb the rich history in one of America's first great cities. Located in the heart of Boston, the Public Garden is an ideal tranquil getaway from the surrounding hustle and bustle of the busy downtown streets. There are dozens of restaurants surrounding the park which offer great take out options for enjoyable picnics. Built in 1837 as the first botanical garden open to the public in the United States, the Boston Public Garden has gradually been filled with several statues commemorating the city's and nation's history. Of course, carefully selected trees such as weeping willows and Elms have been added to beautify the park. Erected in 1869, the bronze equestrian statue of George Washington dominates the western side of the park, allowing visitors to sit on benches on open space lawns and reflect. The walkways of the Public Garden are lined up with other statues such as of Boston politician Charles Sumner and the Ether monument. The focal point of the park is the small pond, which can be crossed over on a pedestrian bridge. The Swan boat rides on the pond, which have been offered since the 19th century, have become trademark activities of Boston. For a small fee, visitors can ride along floating swans, which make the Public Garden their seasonal home in spring and summer.
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Adams National Historical Park
Adams National Historical Park, Quincy, MA, is comprised of the birthplace homes of Presidents John and John Quincy Adams; the Old House, home to four generations of the Adams family; and the Stone Library. Many park programs and special events are offered to give kids of all ages an opportunity to Picture Themselves in the Past and see themselves in their nation's future. Contact the park for dates and details.
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Fenway Park
Fans of America's favorite pastime won't want to miss a game at Fenway Park. Home to the Boston Red Sox, this stadium has been the site of home runs, stolen bases and grounders since 1912.
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Museum of Fine Arts (MFA)
The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston is one of the world's great art museums with masterpieces from around the world and across the ages, including more Monets than any museum outside of Paris, an unrivaled Japanese art collection, treasures from Egypt and the ancient world, and American art from colonial to modern times. At every turn, travel to a time and a place that will inform, enlighten, and inspire. Now open is the spectacular Art of the Americas Wing. Paintings, sculpture, furniture, works on paper, textiles, and decorative arts tell the story of the art of the Americas from the prehistoric times to the present day. More than 5000 glorious examples of art produced in North, Central, and South America are displayed—some for the first time.
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Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum
After Isabella Stewart Gardner's husband died in 1898, the art enthusiast bought land in Boston's Fenway area to open a museum to display her impressive collection of Italian art. The museum, which was fashioned after the Palazzo Barbaro in Venice, was completed in 1902, at which point Gardner moved in to the fourth floor and began installing her collection.
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Village Vacation Valcartier
Only 20 minutes from Québec City, Valcartier Vacation Village becomes the largest winter playground in North America, with more than 35 inner tube runs for thrill-seekers of all ages, 17 mechanical lifts and skating paths. The four steep slopes of the Himalaya are Xtreme fun!
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Rhode Island School of Design Museum (RISD)
The RISD Museum acquires, preserves, exhibits, and interprets works of art and design representing diverse cultures from ancient times to the present. Distinguished by its relationship to the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD), the Museum educates and inspires artists, designers, students, scholars, and the general public through exhibitions, programs, and publications. RISD Museum's collection currently contains more than 100,000 works of art and design dating from ancient times to today including paintings, sculpture, decorative arts, costume and textiles, and furniture from all over the world. Of these objects, 3,352 of them are on view in the Museum now, 81,343 of them are available online, and there are 3,867 recent acquisitions.
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Roger Williams Park
Since the 1890’s, Roger Williams Park has been the premier playground for both Providence and Rhode Island residents. Designed in 1874 by landscape architect Horace W.S. Cleveland, the entire park is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The park’s 435 acres feature over 100 acres of ponds that weave their way through the rolling landscape. Major attractions include the nationally-recognized Roger Williams Park Zoo, the Museum of Natural History and Planetarium, the Botanical Center, the Casino, the Carousel Village, the Temple to Music, the Todd Morsilli tennis courts, and the Tim O’Neil baseball fields.
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Marble House
Marble House was built between 1888 and 1892 for Mr. and Mrs. William K. Vanderbilt. It was a summer house, or "cottage", as Newporters called them in remembrance of the modest houses of the early 19th century. But Marble House was much more; it was a social and architectural landmark that set the pace for Newport's subsequent transformation from a quiet summer colony of wooden houses to the legendary resort of opulent stone palaces. The house was designed by the architect Richard Morris Hunt, inspired by the Petit Trianon at Versailles. The cost of the house was reported in contemporary press accounts to be $11 million, of which $7 million was spent on 500,000 cubic feet of marble. Upon its completion, Mr. Vanderbilt gave the house to his wife as a 39th birthday present. The Vanderbilts divorced in 1895 and Alva married Oliver H.P. Belmont, moving down the street to Belcourt. After his death, she reopened Marble House, and had a Chinese Tea House built on the seaside cliffs, where she hosted rallies for women's right to vote. She sold the house to Frederick H. Prince in 1932. The Preservation Society acquired the house in 1963 from the Prince estate. In 2006, Marble House was designated a National Historic Landmark.