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Glasgow

Population:610,271
Time Zone:UTC1
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Glasgow Botanic Gardens
Glasgow Botanic Gardens is located in the heart of the city’s West End by the River Kelvin and contains a variety of plant collections, woodland copses and riverside walks as well as the famous Kibble Palace. Kibble Palace is a magnificent glasshouse designed by John Kibble and houses the national collection of tree ferns. Plants from tropical rainforests grow in the palm house.
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Strathclyde Country Park
Strathclyde Country Park is an iconic North Lanarkshire Country park which lies in 400 hectares of countryside in the valley of the River Clyde. Set within beautiful surroundings the park is one of the most popular family attractions in the central belt of Scotland, with thousands of visitors coming each year to the park in order to enjoy the vast range of activities and events on offer.
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Glasgow Cathedral
“A fantastic way to travel back in time”. That’s how one visitor recently described this superb medieval cathedral. Just 10 minutes walk from the city centre, it’s the only medieval cathedral on the Scottish mainland to have survived the 1560 Reformation almost entirely intact.
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Glasgow Museums
The City of Glasgow owns one of the richest collections in Europe, displayed in 8* museums and galleries across the city. From paintings by Degas and Cezanne to Sir Roger the Elephant, Charles Rennie Mackintosh furniture to a real Spitfire, fabulous arms and armour to cutting edge contemporary art, Glasgow Museums have objects and exhibits to fire your imagination.
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Glasgow Science Centre
Fun, excitement and intrigue with free interactive science shows, fun workshops like 'Flame On' and 'Hand's On DNA', the amazing BodyWorks exhibition and three floors of fascinating displays showcasing science and life. Glasgow Science Centre is a world of wonder beside the Clyde where you can.
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George Square
The heart of the city, nestled between Glasgow City Chambers and Queen Street train station, is a sprawling square sporting a baker's dozen worth of statues. Ironically, the only statue missing is the titular George himself, King George III. Although one was originally planned, the planning and building of the Square itself coincided with the War of American Independence in the late 1700s. This caused many problems for the so called “Tobacco Lords,” Glaswegian merchants who made their fortunes in trade with the American colonies. This animosity was compounded by loss of the war in 1783, coupled with the fact that the monarch was gripped by insanity leading to his nickname, “The Mad King.” As a result, the powers in Glasgow decided instead to erect the first ever memorial commemorating Sir Walter Scott, the famous Scottish novelist. He is in good company, joined by fellow poets Robert Burns and Thomas Campbell, Queen Victoria and Prince Albert, Prime Ministers Robert Peel and William Ewart Gladstone along with MP James Oswald, army commanders Lord Clyde and Sir John Moore, with engineer James Watt and chemist Thomas Graham.
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Riverside Museum
Riverside Museum is Glasgow's award-winning transport museum. With over 3,000 objects on display there's everything from skateboards to locomotives, paintings to prams and cars to a Stormtrooper. Get hands on with our interactive displays. Walk through Glasgow streets and visit the shops, bar and subway. Climb aboard a train, tram or bus and get a real feel for old public transport. Discover Glasgow's rich shipbuilding history, explore the car and motorbike walls and help put out a fire with our interactive fire engine. There are over 90 large touch screens panels full of images, memories and films that tell the fascinating stories behind the objects. There really is something for all ages to enjoy at the Riverside Museum.
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People's Palace
The People’s Palace is set in historic Glasgow Green. It is home to a collection of objects, photographs, prints and film which give a unique view into how Glaswegians lived, worked and played in years gone by to the present day.
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Kelvingrove Art Gallery & Museum
Kelvingrove Museum opened in 1901 and is a firm favourite with local people and visitors. It has stunning architecture and a family friendly atmosphere. xplore our 22 galleries and discover everything from art to animals, Ancient Egypt to Charles Rennie Mackintosh and so much more. We also have a changing programme of temporary exhibitions and displays. Enjoy an organ recital, a free tour or at weekends and holidays take part in one of our family activities. If you only have one day in Glasgow, Kelvingrove is a must see!
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Gallery of Modern Art
Scotland's most visited art gallery and the centre for Glasgow's extensive modern and contemporary art collection. The gallery provides a thought-provoking programme including displays of local and international artworks from the City’s collection alongside temporary exhibitions and events with artists. There is also a permanent display that charts the history of the building. GoMA is part of Glasgow's civic museum service and has a changing programme of museums' collection and loaned-in exhibitions and associated public programme.
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Edinburgh Zoo
The wildest visitor attraction in Scotland. Edinburgh Zoo is home to over 1,000 rare and beautiful animals from around the world and home to the UK's only giant pandas and koalas. RZSS Edinburgh Zoo is packed with fun and un-zoo-sual things to do. Why not watch zoo's famous penguin parade and visit the world’s only Knighted penguin, Sir Nils Olav. Or spend your day learning about brilliant birds, mischievous meerkats, super strong sun bears and more with daily keeper talks! Get closer than ever to monkeys, lemurs, wallabies and pelicans in a walkthrough habitats or at a daily animal-handling sessions. Watch a Sumatran tiger walk right over your head in Tiger Tracks, an amazing glass viewing tunnel. And if you prefer smaller critters, you’ll enjoy Wee Beasties where you can find reptiles, amphibians and insects. Edinburgh Zoo is unlike any other visitor attraction in Scotland. As part of RZSS, one of Scotland’s leading conservation charities, the Park acts as a gateway to our wider work, both here in Scotland and in over 20 countries around the world.
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Lauriston Castle
With its calm, tranquil atmosphere, and stunning views across the Firth of Forth, Lauriston is the perfect place to escape from the bustle of the city centre. Enjoy a woodland walk, a visit to award-winning Japanese garden, or step back in time and experience what life was like in an Edinburgh middle-class home at the beginning of the 20th century.
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Edinburgh Castle
Edinburgh Castle is one of the most exciting historic sites in Western Europe, Set in the heart of Scotland's dynamic capital city it is sure to capture your imagination. The scenery will take your breath away.
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National Monument of Scotland
The National Monument of Scotland, on Calton Hill in Edinburgh, is Scotland’s national memorial to the Scottish soldiers and sailors who died fighting in the Napoleonic War.
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Scott Monument
Standing proudly in Princes Street Gardens, the Scott Monument is one of the most iconic Edinburgh landmarks, a must-visit for tourists and locals alike. Dedicated to Sir Walter Scott, it is one of the largest monuments to a writer anywhere in the world. Sitting proudly at the base of the monument is Sir Walter himself, carved in Carrara marble by Sir John Steel. This monumental statue, fashioned from a single piece of marble weighing 30 tons, took the sculptor six years to complete. It features Scott and his beloved hound Maida. Join one of the tour guides to find out who Sir Walter Scott was, why such an impressive monument was in his honour and enjoy the breathtaking views of Edinburgh from the third-floor viewing platform - a truly unforgettable experience!
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National Museum of Scotland
Our diverse collections will take you on a journey of discovery through the history of Scotland and around the world, taking in the wonders of nature, art, design and fashion and science and technology – all under one roof.
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Royal Mile
Edinburgh's Royal Mile is the heart of Scotland's historic capital. A short walk away is the Grassmarket, an area steeped in the city's colourful history. The Royal Mile runs through the heart of Edinburgh’s Old Town, connecting the magnificent Edinburgh Castle, perched high on a base of volcanic rock, with the splendorous Palace of Holyroodhouse, resting in the shadow of Arthur's Seat. The Mile is overlooked by impressive, towering tenements, between which cobbled closes and narrow stairways interlock to create a secret underground world. Peppered with superb attractions such as The Real Mary King’s Close or the Scottish Storytelling Centre, historical sites including St Giles' Cathedral and some of the best eating and drinking spots in the city, the Royal Mile offers much to see and do. For a glimpse of recent history, be sure to visit the ultra-modern Scottish Parliament, a striking building boasting a cutting-edge design.
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Museum of Edinburgh
Discover Edinburgh’s fascinating history through the Museum of Edinburgh’s wide and varied collections. In exploring the Museum’s maze of 16th-century buildings, you will see iconic items, beautiful objects and learn fascinating facts and gruesome tales. This free museum is easy to locate on the historic Royal Mile, with our companion Museum The People’s Story directly across the road. With a wide range of stories and objects, this museum has something for young and old, locals and visitors. In addition to the permanent collections, there is a regular programme of special exhibitions hosted at the museum.
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Dynamic Earth
A visit to Dynamic Earth is like nothing else on Earth. It's a chance to experience the primeval forces of nature as they shaped our planet, to journey through space and time and even go on a 4DVENTURE around the world. You'll be embarking on the interactive adventure of a lifetime - the lifetime of our planet.
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Surgeons
If you are fascinated by the wonders of the human body, this museum is a must-visit. Owned by The Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh, Surgeons' Hall Museums consist of the Wohl Pathology Museum, the History of Surgery Museum and The Dental Collection. The museums reopened in 2015 after an extensive refurbishment, making the collections more engaging and accessible than ever before.
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Holyrood Park
Holyrood Park is a short walk from Edinburgh’s Royal Mile in the heart of the city. It is a 640 acre Royal Park adjacent to Holyrood Palace. The parks highest point is Arthurs Seat, an ancient volcano, and sits 251m above sea level giving excellent view of the city; it is also the site of a large and well preserved fort. This is one of four hill forts dating from around 2000 years ago. With its diverse range of flora and geology it is also site of Special Scientific Interest.
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Craigmillar Castle
The castle of Craigmillar is one of the most perfectly preserved castles in Scotland. Even today, the castle retains the character of a medieval stronghold. Building began in the early 15th century, and over the next 250 years the castle became a comfortable residence surrounded by fine gardens and pastureland. The castles history is not only closely involved with the city of Edinburgh, but plays an important part in the story of Mary Queen of Scots who fled to Craigmillar Castle following the murder of Rizzio. It was in the castle where the plot was hatched to murder Marys husband, Lord Darnley.
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The Scottish Deer Centre
See 14 species of deer from around the world at the Scottish Deer Centre, a unique wildlife park in Fife. So much more to see and do other than just deer With 14 species of deer from around the world including Reindeer. Daily Bird Of Prey demonstrations in our outdoor theatre. You can see European Wolves (feeding time 3 pm daily except Friday's), Asian Short Clawed Otters, European Brown Bears, Northern Lynx and Native Red Fox. Also, Regular Guided Tours provided with our Educational Rangers.
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Scotland's Jute Museum
Scotland's Jute Museum (Verdant Works) is a tale of two cities, both of them Dundee. “If it wasnae for the weavers where would we be? We'd be in the poor house or infirmary.” For thousands in the 19th century, Dundee was a city of long working hours, poor pay and ill health. For the privileged few it was a city of opportunity and wealth. At Scotland's Jute Museum (Verdant Works) the rattle and the roar of the original restored machinery, the Juteopolis film show and computer display transport you back over 100 years to an era when jute was king and Dundee was its realm. Absorb the sights, sounds and smells; sense the earth tremble as the original machines roar into life. Hear the workers' tales as they confide their secrets and tell you of their hopes and dreams. With a stunning range of displays including film shows, multimedia computers and hands-on interactives, it's a great fun day out for all the family.
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Tatha Gallery
Tatha Gallery in Newport on Tay, Fife, Scotland is passionate about Fine Art and has some of the best Twentieth Century and Contemporary British Art on display. Our unique art gallery has a strong focus on Scottish Art. The art on display, along with our location on the beautiful banks of the River Tay, opposite the V&A Dundee, makes a recipe for interest, excitement and excellence that very few galleries can match. We host an eclectic and changing programme of exhibitions showcasing Painting, Printmaking, Sculpture and Applied Art; supporting and promoting emerging, mid-career and established artists from Scotland and beyond.
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Discovery Walk
Discovery Walk is a series of plaques honouring the achievements of scientists, innovators and social reformers of the past who either came from or had a strong connection to Dundee. The plaques are set into the pavements around Mary Slessor Gardens at the heart of Dundee's £1 billion Waterfront Redevelopment. There are currently nine plaques commemorating scientists, engineers, writers, artists, social reformers and philanthropists, plus a tenth plaque introducing the Walk. A crowdfunding campaign was launched in late 2016 to fund the addition of five further plaques.
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The McManus - Dundees Art Gallery & Museum
The McManus: Dundee’s Art Gallery & Museum, an award-winning Victorian, Gothic building, is home to Dundee's main collection spanning 400 million years and has been at the heart of art and culture in the City since 1867.
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Dundee Museum of Transport
Welcome to Dundee Museum of Transport, Dundee's latest addition to Scotland's city of culture. We are currently in our temporary premises at Market Mews so why not pop down for a visit!? For some considerable time, a number of independent groups and individuals have been quietly acquiring and preserving our local transport heritage. In February 2010 representatives from several local groups met with a view to establishing Dundee Museum of Transport (DMofT) and, on 2 June 2010, we were granted charitable status. On Saturday 26 April 2014 Dundee Museum of Transport opened to the public for the very first time to showcase the previously hidden transport heritage of Tayside and beyond and is currently based in temporary premises at Market Mews, Dundee.
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Broughty Castle Museum
Discover the people, environment, history and wildlife of Broughty Ferry in this amazing 15th-century coastal fort, which houses a fascinating museum. Enjoy stunning views of Broughty Beach and the Tay estuary. Entry is free. This 15th-century coastal fort has faced many battles and sieges and was rebuilt in the 19th century as part of the River Tay's coastal defence system. It now houses a fascinating museum featuring displays on the life and times of Broughty Ferry, its people, the environment and the wildlife that lives close by. In 2019, the Castle celebrates its 50th anniversary as a museum! Don't miss the Orchar Gallery, featuring a selection of paintings from the amazing Orchar Collection. Enjoy the spectacular views over the River Tay from the observation post. You may even be able to spot a dolphin or two.
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Barnhill Rock Garden
This beautiful garden offers a tranquil environment with spectacular views across the River Tay and boasts a wonderful range of alpines, shrubs, woodland and waterside planting. The Barnhill Rock Garden is an award-winning public park extending to more than two hectares. This beautiful garden boasts a wonderful array of alpines, shrubs, woodland and waterside planting with spectacular views across the River Tay. The garden, which is situated on part of a former nine-hole golf course, was started in 1955 by clearing an area of volcanic rock which at one time had been the old shoreline. Over the years it was then extended eastwards over areas which had once been sand dunes. Visitors and locals alike can enjoy the beauty of the garden which provides an excellent place for recreation and relaxation. Situated on the esplanade in Broughty Ferry, the garden is within a short distance of other amenities and attractions such as restaurants, an award-winning beach, and the 15th century Broughty Castle which overlooks the harbour.
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Claggain Bay
This is a very sheltered part of Islay's east coast. The road towards Claggain Bay is wonderful and offers a wide variety of landscapes, views and great distilleries to visit. Here 3 major distilleries offer tours and a dram and are not to be missed when visiting Islay. After you pass the distillery of Ardbeg the road becomes smaller and passes some sheltered bays on the right where lots of seals bask in the sun. I have counted as much as 27 seals one time. A little further down the road, one of the most interesting historical sites on Islay can be visited. Kildalton church and Cross. The Kildalton cross is well preserved and of great detail and is one of the few remaining in Scotland. Built in the Iona tradition with Pictish, Irish, Northumbrian and Celtic motives. The cross is 2.7 metres tall and can be dated back as far as 800AD. A few miles down the road the most beautiful bay on Islay reveals itself: Claggain Bay. An idyllic and totally unspoilt sandy beach with colourful pebbles waits to be discovered. Lovely birds seek shelter here and the views towards Kintyre are stunning. Claggain Bay is probably one of the most beautiful bays in the whole of Scotland, at least in my opinion. If you park the car on a sunny day without wind and just sit around and watch the views and enjoy the wildlife in this quiet and remote part of islay you never want to leave Islay.
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Kirklinton Hall & Gardens
Take a 17th Century ruin, add 14 acres of gardens and grounds, blend with a sense of history, mix in a large dollop of irreverence; add a generous pinch of fairy dust, and stir. That is the recipe for Kirklinton Hall & Gardens. Also in this stunning garden is an orchard, nuttery, quince grove, bog garden, duck pond and palace, pigs, a yurt, a gypsy caravan and a campsite. A scented rose maze and rose terraces surround the Great Hall. We also have a children's garden with sandpit, playhouse and a Kids Sunflower Bed.
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Bowmore Round Church
The Round Church stands in a magnificent location at the head of the village of Bowmore's Main Street. From here it dominates the village and offers views down the centre of Main Street to Loch Indaal and beyond. It has been described as Islay's best known building, and, give or take a few distilleries, that is very probably true. The Round Church is the commonly used name for what is formally know as Kilarrow Parish Church. It was built between 1767 and 1769 by Daniel Campbell of Shawfield and Islay, who at the time owned Islay in its entirety. The following year work began on a planned village which greatly expanded the existing settlement of Bowmore. Campbell's development of Bowmore was not driven solely by altruistic motives. The new settlement was intended to generate increased rental income, and to allow the clearance of the area's main settlement of Kilarrow, near Bridgend. This in turn was intended to remove development from the area around Campbell's hereditary home, Islay House, and allow its gardens and grounds to be extended. A cynic might suggest that the development of the church was intended to help gain the acceptance of those being moved from Kilarrow to new planned village at Bowmore.
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Arbroath Abbey
Arbroath Abbey is famously associated with the Declaration of Arbroath of 1320, which asserted Scotland's independence from England.Parts of the abbey church and domestic buildings remain, notably the gatehouse range and the abbot's house.
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Loch Gruinart
Loch Gruinart is perhaps one of the most beautiful parts of Islay offering stunning views combined with unique wildlife, rare birds and thousands of geese in the wintertime. From the parking close to the bird hide a track takes the visitor through some sheltered woodland offering nice views over the loch, good birding opportunities and viewing platform. RSPB Loch Gruinart Nature Reserve lies to the north-west of Islay and covers some 1600ha. It is a special kind of nature reserve because it includes a working farm - in fact, the biggest in-hand farming operation on a nature reserve anywhere in the UK, and possibly in Europe. There is something to see year-round at the reserve. Some say the most spectacular time to visit is in October when internationally important numbers of barnacle and white-fronted geese return from Greenland for the winter. At the same time, brent geese and whooper swans fly in from Iceland and stop for a day or two's rest before heading onwards to Ireland. This is also a good time to see birds of prey - hen harriers, sparrow-hawks, merlin, peregrine and golden eagles. Redwings strip bare the berries on the rowan trees, flocks of small birds feed in the autumn stubbles, and choughs pull apart cowpats for dung-beetle larvae.
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Bruichladdich Distillery
Bruichladdich is living proof that the traditional whisky regions of Scotland make no sense. Built in 1881 when puffer-supplied coal was available as an alternative fuel to local peat, it is likely that Bruichladdich was specifically designed to produce the purest unpeated spirit possible. The great Alfred Barnard supports this view with a tantalising clue – the Laddie is the only distillery on Islay that he does not describe as drying its malt using peat in his fascinating exploration of the island’s distilleries in 1885
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Cumbria's Museum of Military Life
Cumbria‘s Museum of Military Life is Carlisle’s newest visitor attraction, telling the 300-year story of Cumbria’s County Infantry Regiment and its soldiers past and present. Get closer to history, with a huge variety of items including uniforms, medals, weapons and silver as well as interactive displays and dioramas. This new state of the art exhibition features a First World War trench environment, immersive audio/visual displays and an interactive trail for young people. The Museum is located right in the heart of historic Carlisle Castle and joint tickets are available from English Heritage.
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Carlisle Castle
Carlisle has over 2000 years of history. Celts, Romans, feuding Border Reivers and invading armies have all left an intriguing legacy for you to explore.
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Tullie House Museum & Art Gallery
Tullie House Museum and Art Gallery is in the heart of Carlisle's historic quarter, and there is no better place to begin exploring the city's fascinating past.
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Old Fire Station
The transformed Old Fire Station opened to the public in May 2015 and offers a packed and varied programme of live music, comedy, theatre and exhibitions. It can also be hired for charity events, concerts, party nights, conferences and meetings, performances and exhibitions. McGrew's Bistro is the perfect place to enjoy a light snack, lunch or why not grab one of their range of beers or selected wines and sit back to enjoy the venue at its best. The building also now hosts Carlisle Contemporary Arts Gallery, an exciting permanent showcase for 10 artists who live, work or create in the city.
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Carlisle Cathedral
Carlisle's imposing Cathedral occupies a central position in the heart of the city's ‘historic quarter'. Founded in 1122, the Cathedral has been rebuilt several times; once in 1292 after a devastating fire and again in the 14th century. The magnificent east window contains some fine 14th-century stained glass. There are also intricate wood carvings, medieval painted panels and the Brougham Triptych - a Flemish altarpiece dating from the 16th century. The Cathedral has free entry, though donations are much appreciated. And there are voluntary guides available to help you get the most out of your visit to this beautiful ecclesiastical building.
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Carlisle Old Town Hall
A prominent two-storey Grade I Listed Building of Medieval origin, the Old Town Hall mostly dates from the 17th and 18th centuries. 1345 is the earliest reference to the predecessor of the building, variously termed the ‘Tollbooth’, 'Common Hall’ and ‘Motehall’ or ‘Moot Hall’ in later medieval sources. In 1668 the medieval hall was demolished to make way for a new one on the same site. It is this building, finished in 1669, with numerous subsequent alterations and extensions which survives today. Over the years, the ground floor of the building has consistently remained in commercial and retail use whilst the grander public rooms at first-floor level have accommodated a number of important civic functions including, most notably the Courts of Assize until 1881, the City’s Magistrates Court until 1941, and Council Chamber and offices of the City of Carlisle Corporation until 1964.
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The Museum of Islay Life
The Islay Museums Trust was formed in 1976 by the Islay Historic Works Group and the Natural History and Antiquarian Society of Islay. A Management Committee was formed of Trustees resident on the island and other interested islanders. The Museum building, the former Free Church of Port Charlotte, was purchased for a nominal sum in the same year and work was started on converting what was a dilapidated ruin. The aims of the Museum: To hold in trust collections reflecting the history of the island of Islay, for the advancement of the education of the general public, and to maintain and enhance those collections. The Museum holds around 2,000 objects over a wide range of subject areas. The Museum has developed a policy for the display of the collection, allowing the rotation of existing items in and out of storage, as well as providing space for short term displays linked to a particular theme, for example, the shipwrecks, the wee museum of childhood and Islay House upstairs and downstairs.