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Calais

Country: France
Population:79,010
Time Zone:UTC+2
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City Hall
City Hall, a Flemish and Neo-Renaissance style construction, is symbolic of the union between the cities of Saint-Pierre and Calais.Its belfry, which culminates at 75 meters, offers an awe-inspiring panoramic view of the city. It is also part of the group of Belfries of Belgium, Northern France and Picardie, listed as UNESCO World Heritage ;
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The Grand Theatre
The Grand Théâtre is remarkable with its Italian architecture, frescoes and acoustics .
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The World War II Museum
La Coupole, located 5 km from Saint-Omer (Nord-Pas-de-Calais), is one of the most impressive remnants of the Second World War in Europe. It is a symbolic place of the Nazi oppression, due to its overwhelming mass, the nature of its underground facilities and the suffering of the slave labourers who built it.
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Abdijmuseum Ten Duinen
Discover the role of the Lords of the Dunes of Koksijde in the Order of Citeaux, a European project before the letter.It's not a dull or dusty affair but a unique archaeological site and a modern museum that tells the story of the silent stones vividly. The religious Maldague silver collection has a permanent home at the Abbey Museum.
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Doornpanne and Hoge Blekker
The Doornpanne, together with De Hoge Blekker and De Schipgatduinen, forms a 240-hectare dune massif. The area comprises various types of dune, from drift dunes and dune grasslands to densely grown pans and fixed inner dunes. A belt of drifting dunes is situated around it, including the highest dune top on the Flemish coast (Hoge Blekker 33 m). The Doornpanne has been a protected landscape since 1975 and was therefore included in the list of nature areas with European protection The central walking and cycling path connects the Witte Burg with the Hoge Blekker. Part of this path is part of the signposted Kustfietsroute and was laid out in shell clay. Following on from this path, the IWVA constructed a hiking trail in chopping wood, to allow the southeastern part of the nature reserve to be explored. A nature trail (3 km) was also laid out along which the walker is invited to appeal to all the senses and in this way discover the Doornpanne. There is also the Doornpannewandelpad (8 km) from the province of West Flanders.
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Westfront Nieuwpoort
What does Nieuwpoort have in common with Namur, Brussels, Antwerp, Ghent, Kortrijk and Bruges? In all of these cities you can find a statue of Albert I, the Soldier King. These bronze riders mark the way the German army invaded Belgium in 1914, up until Nieuwpoort where they came to a grinding halt. This was achieved through the power of seawater and the smart coordination of the sluices and locks. But water wasn’t only an ally, it condemned Nieuwpoort to a crueller fate, the complete destruction of the city as first city at the front. A hundred years later the monument to King Albert I is a serene place in a beautiful landscape, surrounded by water. The ideal place to tell the story of the inundation. This happens in the hypermodern visitor centre ‘Westfront Nieuwpoort’ right under the 2500m² terrace of the monument, with a polyvalent inner circle and 3 exposition wings.
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James Ensor House
Do not fear. To truly understand the master, you must visit his house at least once. The displaying cupboards full of crazy, bizarre, bewildering objects will bring you into the atmosphere of his work, breathing in the air on the piano nobile will do the rest. The Ensor House is closed since November 15th, 2017. Reopening will be after finishing the constructions of the Ensor visitor centre. Keep an eye on the website for more information! The interactive experience centre will offer extensive information about Ensor the artist and the world he lived in. Each of the five experience rooms highlights a specific theme, including Ensor’s studio, the masks, Ensor and Ostend, Death and finally, Society and criticism. The experience centre will also host temporary exhibitions with unique engravings and prints by James Ensor. The perfect place, in other words, to immerse yourself in the artist’s world and work and learn more about this complex and fascinating figure.
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Museum Amandine
April 3rd 1995 - On this day the Amandine entered Oostende harbour for the last time. On this day it dropped anchor for the very last time. The crew disembarked, swallowed hard and went home without looking back. The last page in Oostende's book on Iceland Fishing had been turned. Now, 13 years later, the Amandine has started her second career, a career as an interactive museum. It has taken two years of hard and concentrated work in the old shipyard 'Seghers' to restore the ship to its former glory. But today is the day. Today you can see the ship at the renovated Visserskaai in the heart of Oostende.
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The Main Square
The Lillois' favourite meeting place offers an interesting view of the architecture from the 17th to the 20th century. Standing in the centre of the squares stands the Goddess commemorates Lille's resistance to the Austrian siege in 1792
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The Rihour Palace
Begun in 1453 by Philippe Le Bon, Duke of Burgundy, it is one of the rare reminders of the flamboyant gothic style in Lille. On the ground floor, the Salle des Gardes (Guards room) houses the tourist office.
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The Fine Arts Musuem
Due to the size of its permanent collections, the Palais des Beaux-Arts of Lille is considered to be the second largest general-interest museum in France, just after the Louvre. The building, completed between 1885 and 1892, is typical of the monumental architecture of the late 19th century.
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Musee Lombart
This museum was donated to the town of Doullens in 1908 by Jules François Lombart, a wealthy chocolate manufacturer and keen art collector. There are works by Corot, Chardin, Daubigny and Poulbot (who came from a local family) plus Egyptian objects, including a mummy, and archaeological finds. The museum with its eclectic collection also has a lovely French formal garden.
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Doullens Citadel
The origin of the name "Courtgain" comes from "small wages" and it refers to the picturesque sailors' district, crossed by two little parallel streets: the Rue des Moulins and the Rue des Pilotes which ends near the sailors' wayside cross and oratory with wonderful views. The closely terraced houses dating from the late 18th and early 19th century. They are built with bricks, some parts in cob, with a black base, the rest painted in bright colours, according to the age-old tradition of the fishermen who manned the shrimp boats known as "sauterelliers". The district, decked with lovely flowers, stages the Fête de la Mer every summer.
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Begijnhof (Beguinage)
The 'Princely Beguinage Ten Wijngaarde' with its white-coloured house fronts and tranquil convent garden was founded in 1245. This little piece of world heritage was once the home of the beguines, emancipated lay-women who nevertheless led a pious and celibate life. Today the beguinage is inhabited by nuns of the Order of St. Benedict and several Bruges women who have decided to remain unmarried. In the Beguine's house, you can still get a good idea of what day-to-day life was like in the 17th century.
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Church of Our Lady Bruges
The 115.5 metres high brick tower of the Church of Our Lady is a perfect illustration of the craftsmanship of Bruges’ artisans. The church displays a valuable art collection: Michelangelo’s world-famous Madonna and Child, countless paintings, 13th-century painted sepulchres and the tombs of Mary of Burgundy and Charles the Bold. Useful to know: at the moment, large-scale renovation works are still being carried out, so the church is only partially accessible and many works of art cannot be viewed. The choir was renovated in 2015 and the remarkable church interior can now once again be admired in all its splendour.
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Bruges by Boat
A visit to Bruges isn’t complete without a boat trip on its canals. Go aboard at any of the five landing stages for a half-hour trip that allows you to appreciate the most noteworthy delights of the city from a completely different angle. March to mid-November: daily 10.00 a.m.-6.00 p.m. (last departure at 5.30 p.m.).
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Markt
Markt is the heart of the city and surrounded by many historical highlights. It is filled with pedestrians and bicyclists and a perfect place to get some rest or food in a local restaurant. Markt is dominated by its Belfry, for centuries the city’s foremost edifice and the perfect look-out in case of war, fire or any other calamity. You can still climb to the top of the tower! The statue of Jan Breydel and Pieter de Coninck graces the middle of the square. These two popular heroes of Bruges resisted French oppression and consequently played an important part during the Battle of the Golden Spurs in 1302. Their statue neatly looks out onto the Gothic revival style Provincial Palace. Until the 18th century this used to be the extremely busy Waterhalle, a covered warehouse where goods were loaded and unloaded along the canals that ran alongside the square. Today the canals are still there, albeit underground.
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Belfort (Belfry & Carillon)
The most important of Bruges’ towers stands 83 metres tall. It houses, amongst other things, a carillon with 47 melodious bells. In the reception area, waiting visitors can discover all kinds of interesting information about the history and working of this unique world-heritage protected belfry. Those who take on the challenge of climbing the tower can pause for a breather on the way up in the old treasury, where the city’s charters, seal and public funds were kept during the Middle Ages, and also at the level of the impressive clock or in the carillonneur chamber. Finally, after a tiring 366 steps, your efforts will be rewarded with a breath-taking and unforgettable panoramic view of Bruges and her surroundings.
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Groeningemuseum
The Groeninge Museum offers a varied overview of the history of Belgian plastic arts. Although the Flemish Primitives are a high point, you will also marvel at top 18th and 19th-century neoclassical pieces, masterpieces from Flemish Expressionism and post-war modern art.
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Basilica of the Holy Blood
The Basilica of the Holy Blood is a Roman Catholic basilica in Bruges. The church houses a venerated relic of the Holy Blood allegedly collected by Joseph of Arimathea and brought from the Holy Land by Thierry of Alsace, Count of Flanders. The double church, dedicated to Our Lady and Saint Basil in the 12th century and a basilica since 1923, consists of a lower church that has maintained its Romanesque character and a neo-Gothic upper church, in which the relic of the Holy Blood is preserved. The treasury, with numerous valuable works of art, is also worth a visit.
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Bruges By Horse-drawn Carriage
The half-hour carriage ride along Bruges’ historic winding streets trots off on Markt (at Burg on Wednesday morning). Halfway through the ride the carriage briefly stops at the Beguinage. The coachman gives expert commentary en route.
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Windmills of Bruges
One of the best thing you can do in Bruges is to take a beautiful short walk along the ramparts with its windmills. It is nearby the city center, so after discovering shopping places, beers and coffees, this is a great opportunity to escape from the busy city life for a moment. Belgium has a rich mill history. If you check a map of Bruges from the 16th century, you can see there were no less than 23 windmills here! They were part of the town walls since the end of 13th century. Nowadays, there are four remaining mills between the Dampoort and the Kruispoort: Koeleweimill, Nieuwe Papegaai, Sint-Janshuismill and Bonne Chiere.
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Royal Engineers Museum
You will find something for all the family in Kent's only Designated museum. Exhibits of national and international importance are housed in the Museum's galleries, which tell the story of how the Royal Engineers have helped the British Army live, move and fight since the time of William the Conqueror. See the diverse collection with highlights including Wellington's map from Waterloo, Zulu War weapons, a Harrier Jump Jet, 25 Victoria Crosses and an enormous V2 Rocket. Discover why a large section of the Berlin Wall now lives in the Museum and how one soldier gained the respect of the Chinese emperor. There really is something for everyone at this unique museum.
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For Freedom Museum
The For Freedom Museum shows the bleak times of the Second World War in a dazzling, realistic way. No single inhabitant of the Zwin region and western Zeeland Flanders was spared hardship and repression between 1940 and 1944. This black period in our history forms the main theme of the museum. True-to-life dioramas (goggle-boxes) immerse you in the regional history from 10 May 1940 to 3 November 1944, the day that the thundering guns finally grew silent in the Zwin region. The museum houses three impressive collections. Patrick Tierssoone and Freddy Jones, two old school friends with a passion for history, make available their unique collections of original vehicles and uniforms. The Belgian Aviation History Association (Bahaat), a recognised association of aviation archaeologists, is the third partner with an imposing exhibition of excavated aircraft remains.
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Upnor Castle
Situated on the banks of the River Medway, this attractive turreted castle is set in a picturesque village area backed by rolling, wooded hills. Upnor Castle was originally built on the orders of Queen Elizabeth I in 1559 as a gun fort to defend her warships at anchor in the reaches of the Medway and Chatham Dockyard. Although the castle was an important link in the defence line, it was not well maintained and proved ineffective when the Dutch, under the command of Admiral de Ruyter, sailed up the Medway in June 1667 to attack the dockyard. The enemy fleet met very little resistance and when it left two days later, it had destroyed or captured a large number of the Royal Navy ships anchored at Chatham.
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Musuem of Zwin Region Sincfala
Discover in the visitors centre the fascinating and tumultuous history of 2000 years Zwin region: the reclamation of the polders, the unique scale model of the port town of Sluis arround 1400, wars in the region, the emergence of the villages of Duinbergen and Het Zoute, the development of tourism. Children love Fonske and his wonderful stories. Fonske is the son of a fisherman and lives in the museum. He’s really good at telling visitors about life on board a fishing vessel or how to catch shrimp. A visit to Fonske’s attic is highly recommended. Make a fort with puzzle pieces or dive into his dress up trunk and step out as a bold pirate. In the old school building (1899) you can immerse yourself in the hard life of the fishermen and their families. Taste the particular people's culture. Take a seat on the school desks.
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Eastgate House
Once the family home of Sir Peter Buck, a senior officer at the Royal Tudor Dockyard, the house has also been a Victorian boarding school, a hostel, a museum and an inspiration to the great author Charles Dickens. As part of a £2.2million Heritage Lottery Funded project, Eastgate House has undergone major refurbishment works and is now open to the public. Many of the building's original features and decorative schemes have been carefully restored, and new heating and lighting have been installed. Access has been greatly improved with a new lift at the back of the building, and the second floor of the house is open to visitors for the first time in more than 40 years. Visitors to the house can explore the amazing rooms of the house while learning the remarkable story of those who lived, worked and played here throughout the centuries.
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Restoration House
Fabled city mansion, stayed in by Charles II on eve of his restoration and the Satis House of Great Expectations. Superbly poetic interiors with a wonderful collection of English furniture and paintings, including several Gainsboroughs and Reynolds and rare Constable portraits. A good collection of English pottery and treen. The deliciously maintained twin-walled gardens of an acre now complemented by the ongoing restoration of monumental renaissance garden.
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Six Poor Travellers House
A Tudor charity house founded by the Elizabethan MP Richard Watts to provide board and lodgings for six poor travellers and continued to do so right up to the Second World War. The house and charity are immortalised in Dickens' Christmas short story entitled The Seven Poor Travellers. A courtyard and herb garden attracts many visitors in the summer.
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Huguenot Museum
Britain’s very first museum of Huguenot history has opened its doors to the public. Following a £1.5 million development project, Rochester’s museum tells the dramatic story of the Huguenots, their persecution in France, escape to Britain and the trades, crafts and skills they brought with them that has since contributed to the formation of modern Britain. Alongside beautiful new galleries displaying objects never seen by the public before, the museum also has a vibrant and engaging learning space. Here visitors will be able to further their learning either through a craft workshop, talk, lecture, film screening or cross-curricular schools session.
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The Caves of Naours
The limestone of the Picardy plateau was dug out in many places to form refuges. These refugees were called "muches" (hideouts in Picard language). Those in Naours, rediscovered at the end of the last century, are the largest known: all the underground areas combined can house around 2,600 people with their livestock. The layout is remarkable: around 300 chambers, public squares, stables, wells, chimneys, and a chapel with three naves. These underground areas were used by the British forces during the First World War and were used as the headquarters of the German forces during the second world war. Exhibitions of traditional trades. In the park: games, 2 windmills from the 18th century.
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Rochester Cathedral
Experience a spiritual moment in Rochester Cathedral and visit a church that has been celebrating Christian worship since 604AD. The history and heritage of Rochester Cathedral is boasted in its stunning architecture. Its walls hum with the prayer of thousands of years.
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Rochester Guildhall Museum
The Rochester Guildhall was built in 1687 and is one of the finest 17th-century civic buildings in Kent. Its staircase and main hall have magnificent plaster ceilings, given in 1695 by Admiral Sir Cloudsley Shovell, who was the Member of Parliament for the city of Rochester at the time.
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Rochester Castle
The great keep of Rochester Castle towers over the River Medway, dominating the skyline together with its striking twin, the magnificent cathedral.
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Temple Manor
A rare surviving 13th-century house belonging to the Knights Templar - an order of soldiers established in the crusading period to protect the holy lands and the pilgrims who travelled to them. Its original purpose was to provide lodgings and fresh horses for members of this order on their way to and from the crusades. The stone building that exists today once formed part of a larger range of buildings which included a hall, kitchens, barns and stables. Remains of 13th-century wall plaster can still be seen.
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Casino Knokke
Knokke Casino is a seafront casino in the town of Knokke, in the administrative community Knokke-Heist, in the province of West Flanders in Flanders, Belgium. Enjoy spending time a room with slot machines you will find a wide selection of traditional roll machines and contemporary video machines. With blackjack you play against the dealer and the aim is to achieve a score as close as possible to 21. With roulette it is about predicting the winning number. The number where the bullet falls after turning the cylinder wins. Also Napoleon Games Grand Casino has several rooms and is therefore extremely suitable for company, dance and wedding parties, anniversaries and seminars.
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