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Alexandria

Country: Egypt
Population:3,811,512
Time Zone:UTC+2
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Alexandria National Museum
Located close to the center of the city, the Alexandria National Museum nicely sums up the history of Alexandria in the three floors of the now renovated Italianate style Al-Saad Bassili Pasha Palace.
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Abu Al-Abbas Al-Mursi Mosque
Abu Al-Abbas Al-Mursi is Alexandria’s largest mosque; with a cream coloured facade, four great domes, arabesque designs and a high minaret, the mosque is a beautiful sight.
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Anfushi Fish Market
In a coastal city like Alexandria, serving as the largest seaport in Egypt, it is only normal to expect to find a bustling fish market.
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Giza Pyramids Tour
Giza Pyramids Tour | Tours-to-egypt.com Want to know about the Giza pyramids tour? Tours-to-egypt.com will help you to choose the best trip plan to fully make an extraordinary tour. For more info visit our website today.Contact Us-Nile Cruisershesham@tours-to-egypt.comAs Saha. Abdeen - CairoEgypt+201208599033Of the original Seven Wonders, only one—the Great Pyramid of Giza (also called the Pyramid of Khufu) remains intact. If you are in Cairo for business or holiday visits so do not miss the chance to book our Giza Pyramids Tour. we will organize everything for you from transportation to the professional guide who will accompany you during your tour and recover the mysterious stories about the Great Pyramids also answer all of your questionsFor Hotel Booking, Plan your stay in Giza IncludedTwo ways transfer from your hotel and return by a private air-conditioned vehiclePrivate your language speaking Egyptologist guide (Contact us to check available languages)Entrance fees to all the mentioned sitesBottled water during your trip.All taxes & service charge
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The Great Pyramids of Giza
There are three major pyramids in the pyramids necropolis in Giza. If you do not fear small spaces, take the opportunity to step inside the small cavity of the Great Pyramid (for a negotiable tip or fee) to experience the pyramid’s rather daunting descending staircase as well as the king’s and queen’s respective burial chambers. The Great Pyramid of Khufu is believed to have been built over a twenty-year period and completed around the year 2560 B.C. For centuries, the Pyramid held the record as the tallest man-made structure in the world. Besides the many theories and symbolism that it embodies, the Pyramid is one of the most breathtaking monuments of Ancient Egypt; take a trip to gaze at its peak and see for yourself. Although not as magnificently large as the Great Pyramid of Khufu, the Pyramid of Khafra has a more complex interior and a large number of statues dedicated to Khafra, son of Khufu, including the Sphinx. The smallest of the three, the Pyramid of Menkara rarely gets the same attention as its two larger neighbours; as it lacks the size of Khufu and the Sphinx of Khafra. Menkara’s one advantage may be its material: the two predecessors used limestone, whereas Menkara used the more valuable and pricier granite in his burial chambers.
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The Egyptian Museum
It may not be the oldest museum exhibiting Egyptian antiquities, but the Egyptian Museum holds the most: over 150,000 pieces are on display, with an incredible 30,000 more stocked away. After an initial ID check at the Egyptian Museum’s entrance just off of Tahrir Square, there is a bag check at the main gates. Once you have acquired your ticket, there is yet another queue for ticket checks, before you enter through the museum doors, upon which you are subjected to another electronic sensor. Despite the museum’s website claims, you are not allowed to bring a camera in under any circumstances. Upon entering the museum, you will feel like a rogue archaeologist that has stumbled on a tomb of treasures. You are immediately confronted by three routes. Taking a left will start you off on the chronological route through Egyptian history. Once you’ve figured out the slightly confusing numbering, room fourteen is a secret little pleasure and a must-see. Guarded by statues on either side of its entrance, the room is built like a temple. Steles are used to cover the walls, as a huge, inscribed pillar seems to hold up the ceiling of the museum itself.
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Khan El Khalili
There’s absolutely nothing in Cairo like exploring the enormous shopping labyrinth of Khan El Khalili, the city’s largest souk that has preserved much of its original structure since its days as a famous medieval bazaar. Tourists and Egyptians alike arrive at this densely populated maze of streets and alleyways to find all sorts of gifts, including Egyptian antiques, fine handmade crafts, shishas and spices.
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City of the Dead
Even Cairo, a bustling capital city of 21 million or so people, has its secrets and obscurities, not least the City of the Dead. Located below Mokattam Hills in the south east of the city, the area is essentially a necropolis; but over the centuries it has evolved into a living, breathing organism of its own that has managed to reach a certain degree of self-sufficiency. Though considered a slum – and it’d be hard to argue that – it also stands as one monument to Cairo’s colourful history. Running along the city from north to south, the strip is around 6.4km long. The City of the Dead dates back to the Muslim conquest of Egypt in 642 AD, when Amr Ibn Al ‘as established a family graveyard at the foot of Mokattam. Many of the residents are said to have moved there to be close to deceased relatives. It has been something of a touristic site for centuries, with the likes of Moroccan scholar, Ibn Batuta –widely considered to be one of the greatest travelers in history – having visited and written about it.
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Cairo Citadel
As familiar and known a sight as that of the Giza Pyramids, the medieval Citadel sits conspicuously over the haze of Cairo’s minarets, with the Mohammed Ali mosque glimmering like a beacon to all travellers, visitors and Cairenes alike. The gentle breeze from the hilltop location brings to mind a legend about Saladin, the builder of this medieval fortress in the 12th century. In the search to build a proper fortress against the Crusaders, he hung pieces of meat throughout Cairo and swore that wherever the meat stayed fresh the longest would become the location of his fortress. All the meat he placed was ruined in a day except for the meat hung on a hilltop near Cairo, where the fresh breeze kept the meat fresh for days. Who knows? Maybe he built the Citadel on a hill because in his native mountainous Syria most fortresses were built in strategic high locations, or maybe fresh meat was a big deal to Saladin. The Citadel is a popular destination for tour groups and local school field trips. While most tourists are taken to the Hagia Sophia inspired Mohammed Ali mosque, they might miss the great sites that lie nearby, marking massacres, harem palaces, spiral wells, royal court drama, crime, and ancient Egyptian ruins.
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The Mosque of Muhammad Ali
Located on Rhoda Island in Cairo’s Manial district, the Prince Mohammed Ali Palace is unlike any historical site in the capital. Built by the uncle of King Farouk, Prince Mohammed Ali Tewfik, between 1899 and 1929, what makes the palace stand out – even next to anything you’ll find in Old Cairo, which sits a stone’s throw away across a branch of the Nile – is its unique fusion of Ottoman, Persian, art nouveau and late baroque inspirations. Divided into five distinctly conceived and designed buildings which sit in the middle of a stunning Persian garden, the palace was as much a home to Mohammed Ali’s grand collection of art, furniture, clothing and medieval manuscripts as it was for him. Lending itself to a museum blueprint, the palace was handed over to the Supreme Council of Antiquities – a former branch of the Ministry of Culture – in 1955 and quickly became one of the most striking reminders of the Mohammed Ali dynasty. The palace is also home to one of the world’s most lavish collections of Oriental carpets and rugs, while the walls silk embroideries and portraits of royals.
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St.Samaan Church
It’s become something of a cliché – a sad one at that – but we’ve said it before and we’ll say it again: there’s much more to Egypt than Ancient Egyptian antiquities. Granted, the Zabaleen area of Mokattam receives its fare share of attention for its sheer uniqueness, but one particular feature often goes unnoticed – St. Samaan Church. The church is named after Samaan Al Kharaz (Simon the Ranner), who, according to the tradition, performed a miracle in moving the mountain to help Abraam – Pope of the Egyptian Church – prove his faith to a Jewish grand vizier. The areas of the mountain around the church also feature a number of carvings. These carvings were done by a Polish artist in 1995 and was commissioned by the church’s founder, Samaan Ibrahim. In addition to the church itself – which can seat up to 1000 people – the monastery also include a library, children’s playground and a cafeteria.
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Pyramid of Djoser
Built as a tomb for the pharaoh Djoser (or Zoser), the Djoser Pyramid was constructed between 2630 BC and 2611 BC in Saqqara, Egypt. Although it is considered the world’s oldest intact large-scale stone monument, the ancient structure is often overshadowed by Egypt’s most famous pyramids. The Djoser Pyramid stands 197 feet high and was built using 11.6 million cubic feet of stone and clay. Imhotep—a doctor, priest, and sculptor, among other titles and talents—is widely attributed as the pyramid’s architect. Initially, the structure was designed as a traditional, flat-roofed tomb called a mastaba, but Djoser wanted something bigger, something grander. The pyramid was part of a larger 40-acre complex containing a courtyard, temples, and chapels, all enclosed inside a 30-foot wall. The entrance to the complex, as well as 13 fake doors, is built into the wall. The complex also includes a number of building facades, all of which served ritual purposes. The pharaoh’s burial chambers are located deep within the pyramid, along with those of his 11 daughters. The burial chamber is part of the pyramid’s winding, maze-like series of tunnels, which researchers think may have been designed to prevent theft (although the pyramid was eventually looted).
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Paphos Castle
Standing grandly at the west end of the town’s harbour, Pafos (Paphos) Castle (Medieval Fort) was originally a Byzantine fort built to protect the harbour, and was rebuilt by the Lusignans in the 13th century, but then dismantled by the Venetians. The Ottomans rebuilt it in the 16th century when they conquered the island. What survives today is the 1592 Ottoman restoration of the western Frankish tower with its Venetian additions. An inscription above the only entrance of the castle bears witness to this restoration. The main part of the castle is a big square tower that has an enclosed courtyard in the middle. The ground floor consists of a central hall with small rooms on each of its two long sides, which were used as prison cells during Ottoman Rule. There are 12 battlements on the roof, which received a corresponding number of cannons. The Ottomans removed the cannons in 1878, when they handed over the administration of the island to the British, who used the castle as a salt store until 1935, when it was declared an Ancient Monument under the Antiquities Law.
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Medieval Castle of Paphos
As you eat or walk along the seafront, you will enjoy the view of the medieval castle that adorns the port of Pafos. Pafos Castle was originally a Byzantine fortress, built in 965 AD for the protection of the port. It was completely destroyed by an earthquake in 1222 AD. The castle was rebuilt by the Lusignans around the end of the 12th century to replace the fort of "Forty Columns" for the defence of the island, especially during the Medieval Period (1192-1489). It was destroyed shortly before 1570 by the Venetians, to stop it from being used by the Ottoman Turks, whose invasion of Cyprus was expected. The Turks did indeed invade the island and restored the castle in 1592. They even strengthened it with new fortifications as stated in a Turkish inscription above the entrance. The ground floor consists of a central hall which opened to several small spaces. Under Turkish rule, these were used as prisons. Pafos (Paphos) Castle served as a fortress, as a prison and also as a salt storage area during the period in which the island was a British colony. In 1935 it was declared an ancient monument.
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Archaeological Park of Kato Pafos
The Archaeological Park of Kato Pafos (Paphos) is one of the most important archaeological sites of Cyprus and has been included in the UNESCO World Heritage Sites list since 1980. Nicocles, the last King of Palaipafos moved the city from the previous location to its present location near the harbour at the end of the 4th century BC. Between the 2nd century BC and 4th century AD, Pafos was the capital city of Cyprus. The Park includes sites and monuments from the 4th century BC to the Middle Ages, while most remains date to the Roman period. The intricate mosaic floors of four Roman villas (the houses of Dionysos, Theseus, Aion and Orpheus) form the impressive epicentre of the finds, and depict various scenes from Greek Mythology. The complex also includes other important monuments, such as the Asklepieion, the Odeon, the Agora, the Saranta Kolones (Forty Columns) Castle, the Limeniotissa ruins of an Early Christian Basilica, and the Tombs of the Kings.
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Paphos Waterpark
Paphos Aphrodite Waterpark is the BIGGEST WATERPARK in the Paphos region, a one-of-a-kind naturally landscaped aqua adventure centre. Situated in Kato Paphos on the coastal road easily accessible by car or the local bus which drops off right on our doorstep! This non-stop aquatic thrill features, high-speed water slides, an extensive lazy river, wave surge pool, lots of swimming areas and a spectacular kids water-play area, with food court and beverage areas spread throughout the park connected by a lush, tropical environments that are both immersive and interconnected.
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Tombs of the Kings
The famous ‘Tombs of the Kings’ form part of the Archaeological Park of Kato Pafos (Paphos) - one of the most important archaeological sites of Cyprus that has been included in the UNESCO World Heritage Sites list since 1980. The monumental underground tombs are carved out of solid rock and date back to the Hellenistic and Roman periods. Rather than kings, it is actually high ranking officials and aristocracy that were buried here, but the size and splendour of the tombs – some decorated with Doric pillars - gave the locality its grand name. Some of the tombs imitate the houses of the living, with the burial chambers opening onto a peristyle atrium. They are similar to tombs found in Alexandria, demonstrating the close relations between the two cities during the Hellenistic period.
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Agia Paraskevi Church
Located in the village of Geroskipou, this interesting 9th century Byzantine church is a five-domed, three-aisled, barrel-vaulted basilica, making it one of only two such churches on the whole island, and a significant example of Byzantine architecture. The beautiful interior wall paintings date to various periods, from the 8th-15th centuries. A monochrome reddish cross, painted directly on the stone, is of an earlier type and was revealed during restoration works. This type of cross is usually dated to the Early Christian period, up until the 8th-9th century. Apart from its frescoes, the church also contains a rather significant portable, double-sided icon, dating to the 15th century. The Virgin Mary is depicted on one side, and the scene of the Crucifixion on the other. According to tradition, the name Geroskipou (‘sacred garden’ in Greek) derives from the sacred gardens of the Goddess Aphrodite, which were located to the south of the village towards the sea, at the point where the ancient pilgrims began their journey to the sanctuary of Palaipafos (old Pafos). As such, the church may stand on the ruins of an ancient temple dedicated to Aphrodite, although it could also originally have been dedicated to Timios Stavros (the Holy Cross). Today, it is dedicated to the Christian martyr Agia Paraskevi.
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Paphos Archaeological Museum
The Pafos District Archaeological Museum houses a collection of finds from the Pafos (Paphos) region dating from the Neolithic Age to 1700 AD. The exhibits are set across five rooms and originate mainly from Palaipafos (Kouklia), Nea Pafos (present­ day Pafos) and Marion-Arsinoe (Polis). They are supplemented by finds from Pegeia, Kissonerga, Lempa, Pano Arodes, Salamiou, Akourdalia, Pomos, Kidasi and Geroskipou. The first room covers the Neolithic, Chalcolithic and Bronze Age, including coins cut from the mint of Pafos. The second room houses exhibits from the Iron Age and Classical period, including a tombstone from Marion with the Cyprosyllabic script. The third room presents the Hellenistic and Roman periods, with a rare marble bust of Aphrodite and a marble statue of Asklepios. The fourth room hosts exhibits from the late Roman and early Christian periods, while the newer fifth room showcases pieces from the Byzantine Period and the Middle Ages in general.
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Coral Bay Beach
A coast that ranks amongst the loveliest of the region. Located in the Pafos (Paphos) region in Pegeia - a thriving tourist resort - the 500-metre long, Coral Bay Beach is considered to be one of the loveliest coasts of the area. The sands are deep golden, and the clean seawaters here are calm and shallow, making it a popular choice for all, including families with children. The beach is enclosed by a pair of limestone headlands and has abundant greenery, further enhancing its beauty.
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Neve Tzedek
Neve Tzedek may well be one of Tel Aviv’s oldest districts, but it’s still young at heart! Newe Tzedek or Neve Tsedek, as it is also known is another district of Tel Aviv which has become increasingly fashionable in recent years, as restoration works have taken place to restore it to its former glory. Built in 1887, Neve Tzedek was the first Jewish neighbourhood outside of the old port city of Jaffa, built as a suburb. Its Oriental architectural style, combined with quaint, narrow streets with boutiques, make Neve Tzedek, which means Oasis of Justice, quite literally an oasis in the modern city. Neve Tzedek is today a real oasis in the bustling city of Tel Aviv. The magnificent buildings are all individual, and a relaxing stroll through the neighbourhood is a great way to spend some time. Shabazi Street is the main street through Neve Tzedek and, like many of the smaller side passages is lined with boutiques, galleries, and craft shops. The Suzanne Dellal Center is Tel Aviv’s dance centre with a superb piazza and interesting gardens, whilst popular cafe Suzanna shouldn’t be missed.
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Tayelet Of Tel Aviv
Tayelet is the Hebrew word for promenade. In Tel Aviv, this refers to the pedestrian promenade running the length of the city’s beaches from the Tel Aviv Port in the North through to Jaffa in the South. Beyond the city’s borders, the promenade also reaches North to Herzliya and to Jaffa’s southern neighbor of Bat Yam. The Tel Aviv Tayelet is bordered on one side by the Mediterranean Coast. In many areas, sandy beaches filled with sunbathers, volleyball nets, paddle ball games (matkot) and cafes accompany the sparkling blue waters. The Jaffa section is comprised of Charles Kalore Park, featuring grass, playgrounds and rocky breakers for breathtaking views. The Tel Aviv Port offers boardwalks, restaurants and a variety of entertainment options and special events. The main stretch of the Tel Aviv Tayelet is surrounded by large hotels and activities suited to a beach-filled afternoon. Everything from top-quality fish restaurants and steakhouses to McDonald's and Kentucky Fried Chicken can be found along the Tayelet. At night, there is a bar option suited to every taste; beach-side venues filled with couches for relaxation, dance bars, live music and rooftop lounges are open every night of the week. The Tayelet is also home to Tel Aviv’s Tourist Information Center, many health and beauty spas, ice cream shops, and schools for surfing and sailing. It is also a popular place for jogging and biking.
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Gordon Beach
Centrally located at the corner of Gordon Street and HaYarkon Street, the Gordon Beach is one of the busiest and most popular of Tel Aviv’s Mediterranean-side beaches. Gordon Beach is within walking distance from many of Tel Aviv’s most exclusive hotels, including the Renaissance Hotel, Carlton Hotel, Hilton Hotel, Sheraton Hotel and Crowne Plaza Hotel and is directly accessible from many of these hotels. On Gordon Beach, visitors will find soft sands, sparkling blue waters and a mix of tourists and locals. The beach features volleyball courts which are constantly filled with enthusiasts and local leagues. Paddleball players focused on 'matkot', Israel’s popular version of the beach sport, play up and down the Mediterranean shore. A variety of coffee shops, ice cream stores, restaurants and bars are situated on the beach, adjacent pedestrian promenade and nearby Atarim Square. The Tel Aviv Marina, offering water sports and professional instruction, is next to Gordon Beach, as is the newly-renovated, saltwater-filled Gordon Swimming Pool. On Friday and Saturday afternoons, locals flock to Gordon Beach to participate in traditional Israeli folk dancing taught on the promenade. A lifeguard station is on duty during the summer season from the morning until 7pm. Yoga and pilates classes are taught on Gordon Beach during the summer; class hours are on display at the beach. Parking, public showers and changing rooms are all available nearby.
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Rubin Museum
The Rubin Museum in Tel Aviv is located in the center of the city, in what once served as home and studio of world-renowned painter, Reuven Rubin. Reuven Rubin was the first Israeli painter to receive international acknowledgement and appreciation. Born in Romania, Rubin moved to Israel in 1912 to study painting at Jerusalem’s Bezalel Academy of Art. He continued his studies in Paris before setting up his studio and officially immigrating to Israel in 1923. Over the course of his career, Rubin was named Chairman of the Association of Painters and Sculptors of Palestine, received the Dizengoff Prize and, in 1973 was awarded the Israel Prize for lifetime achievement in art. Rubin died in 1974, leaving his home and studio to his beloved city of Tel Aviv. On display at the museum are close to fifty of Rubin’s paintings created throughout his career in Israel. The museum features multimedia presentations about the artist’s life and work. The Rubin Museum in Tel Aviv also features paintings by contemporary Israeli artists, a shop with reproductions of the artist’s work, and a tour of Rubin’s studio.
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Habima Theater
The Habima Theater has been Israel’s National Theater since 1935. It was originally the conception of organizers Hannah Rubina and Aaron Baskin, who brought with them from Moscow to Tel Aviv the idea of promoting a unique Hebrew-language theatre and local actors. In keeping with its original purpose, the Habima Theater hosts live theatre, unique events and seminars. Plays chosen at the Habima Theater most often deal with issues important to the State of Israel and its diverse mixture of population. Recurring themes include tensions between Arab and Jewish Israelis, religious and secular Jews, new immigrants and native-born Israelis, and Holocaust memoirs, government corruption or the issue of foreign workers. In order to reach out to all audiences, the Habima Theater also features classic international plays and organizes acting workshops and activities for Israeli youth. Simultaneous translation is available for most live performances. Additionally, the Habima Theater is a member of the Union of the Theatres of Europe and is often invited to join in world tours as a result of this prestigious membership. The original Habima Theater building, which is located at the end of Rothschild Boulevard, has been renovated and was recently inaugurated in the art complex next to the Helena Rubinstein Pavilion for Contemporary Art and the Mann Auditorium, home of the Israeli Philharmonic Orchestra.
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Tel-Aviv Museum of Art
The Tel Aviv Museum of Art houses one of the world’s largest collections of Israeli art. The collection represents the work of some of the leading Jewish artists of the first half of the 20th century and many of the major movements of modern art of this time. The modern and contemporary art museum is a part of the Golda Meir Cultural and Art Center complex, also featuring the Israeli Opera and Cameri Theater. The permanent and temporary exhibitions shown at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art display work by Israeli artists, as well as many infamous international painters. The museum is also home to an art library and archive serving art students and professionals throughout Israel. The Joseph and Rebecca Meyerhoff Art Education Center provides classes in a variety of fields to adults and children. The Helena Rubinstein Pavilion for Contemporary Art offers a space to showcase young Israeli talent. The Herta and Paul Amir Building houses an Israeli Architecture Archive and a new section of photography and visual arts. Over 500,000 guests visit the Tel Aviv Museum of Art each year, to enjoy its wide variety of painting, photography, video, sculpture, as well as to participate in the many events held within the museum building. The Tel Aviv Museum of Art is open daily from 10 am. The museum closes at 4 pm on Monday, Wednesday and Saturday, 8 pm on Tuesday and Thursday, and 2 pm on Friday. The museum is closed on Sunday. Museum admission is 42 shekels for adult visitors and free for children up to age 18.
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Azrieli Center
Azrieli Center is a complex comprised of three distinct skyscrapers one circlular, one triangular and one square in the center of Tel Aviv. Named after the founder, Architect David Azrieli. T he Circular Tower is the second tallest building in Israel. It was completed in 1999 and has 49 floors. The building’s top floor boasts a restaurant, as well as an observation deck with a clear view of the entire city. The Triangular Tower was finished in 1999 and has 46 floors. With 42 floors, including the thirteen-floor Crowne Plaza City Center Hotel, the Square Tower was the last to be completed in 2007. Many of Israel’s most prominent companies are based in or around the Azrieli Center. At the base of the three office buildings lies one of Israel’s largest shopping malls. The Azrieli Center Mall boasts over 30 fast food and high-quality restaurants and cafes. The shopping opportunities include branches all of Israel’s finest stores, as well as flagship international brand names like H&M, Gap and Mango. The Azrieli Center Mall also houses a fitness center, grocery store, educational learning centers and a rooftop Gymboree. The Azrieli Center is located on the corner of Begin and Hashalom Streets. It is just a minute from the Hashalom entrance to Ayalon Highway. It is connected by bridge to the Tel Aviv Hashalom Train Station. A bridge in the opposite direction also connects the mall to Hakirya, the Tel Aviv branch of the IDF military intelligence unit.
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Museum of the Jewish People at Beit Hatfutsot
Beit Hatfutsot' - The Museum of the Jewish People (The Disapora House), the Nahum Goldmann Museum of the Jewish Diaspora, is located on the campus of Tel Aviv University. The Museum of the Jewish People tells the story of the Jewish People from its expulsion from the holy land 2,600 years ago to the present day. The Museum of the Jewish People exhibits the diverse histories of the many Jewish communities around the world. It connects visitors with their roots, offers reproductions of beautifully designed synagogues, pictures depicting the differing religious customs and cultural traditions of various communities, and describes the complex and ongoing journey of the Jewish people “Among the Nations.”
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Ramat Gan Safari
The Zoological Center Tel Aviv – Ramat Gan Safari is a 1000 dunam oasis in the middle of greater Tel Aviv’s highly populated urban metropolis. The Zoological Center Tel Aviv – Ramat Gan Safari contains over 1,600 different animal species, in various habitats created to mimic their natural environments and provide animal education to guests of all ages. The Zoological Center Tel Aviv – Ramat Gan Safari provides professionally guided educational tours to take families, kindergarten classes, individuals and other groups through the various wildlife departments. Following a walking tour through the zoo area to see reptiles, mammals and birds, take your car through the safari where giraffes, lions and many other wildlife spend their days and nights. Among the guided tours offered at the Zoological Center Tel Aviv – Ramat Gan Safari are a varied menu of unique, specialized tours. These range from the Morning Tour, in which guests accompany Safari employees as they feed the animals and enter the desert like safari area on a tractor, or the adults only Midnight Tour which gives a firsthand view of the “late night activities” of hippos, lions and bears.
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Kourion Archaeological Site
The archaeological remains of Kourion - which was one of the island’s most important city-kingdoms in antiquity - are of the most impressive on the island, and excavations have unearthed many significant finds, which can be viewed at the site.
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Kourion Ancient Amphitheater
One of the most beautiful and interesting for visiting amphitheatres is located in Kourion. It will amaze travellers with its majestic appearance, the beauty of the preserved antique mosaics and the magnificent panoramic view that opens from spectators’ seats.
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Agios Ermogenis
Agios Ermogenis is a picturesque small beach named after the homonymous chapel that lies right above it. Saint (Agios in Greek) Ermogenis is the patron Saint of the athletes.
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The Limassol Marina
The Limassol Marina will provide for the mooring of yachts at sea and on shore. Additionally, the project includes the development of residential, commercial units as well as buildings for cultural uses.
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The Limassol Castle
The Limassol Castle is situated in the centre of old Limassol, is a remnant from the presence of Crusaders on the island. It was built in the 13th century on the site of an earlier Byzantine castle and has been converted today into the Cyprus Medieval Museum.
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Limassol City Center
Limassol's historical centre is located around its medieval Limassol Castle and the Old Port. Today the city spreads along the Mediterranean coast and has extended much farther than the castle and port, with its suburbs stretching along the coast to Amathus.
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Kykkos Monastery
Located in the mountainous region of Marathasa Valley, the Monastery of Kykkos is the wealthiest and most lavish on the island, and stands on a mountain peak, at an altitude of 1.318 metres.