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Alanya

Country: Turkey
Population:113,027
Time Zone:UTC+3
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Alanya Archaeological Museum
Museum has been opened in 1967. Museum opened as archeological and ethnography museum. But after the Atatürk house and museum designing, the museum became Alanya Archaeological Museum at 2010 .
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Sapadere Canyon
Sapadere Canyon is a natural sight definitely worth seeing if you like nature and walking. The canyon was opened in 2008, until then it was only known by locals living in the area. It is app. 800m long and 400m high and it was formed by water, ice and wind erosion. You will be amazed by the picturesque nature scenes, numerous small waterfalls rushing over stones, various plants and aminals, especially birds and butterflies. Even the air in Sapadere Canyon is different from the coast, its more fresh which offeres a nice break in summer heat. Moreover, the turkuaz water in the river is rarely over 10 degrees celsius even though the air reaches 30+. There is an opportunity to jump into the natural water pool at the end of the path or walk down the stairs to try the water yourself. A wooden environment friendly platform has been constructed along the river for visitors. You can take an individual trip to Sapadere Canyon, take a taxi or join an organised tour. If you drive yourself, go app. 20Km east from Alanya centre and then turn left to Demirtas village, drive up the village and then follow the signes until the Sapadere Canyon.
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Damlatas Cave
It was found in 1948 by accidantelly while getting stones for Alanya harbour. After that opned for public.It is one of the first cave which was opened for touristic reason in Turkey.
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Damlatas Beach
Damlataş beach in the eastern part of the Cleopatra beach situated just under the peninsula with the It is suitable for snorkelling and there are daily diving boats coming to dive in the area as well. The Damlataş beach is quite wide with golden fine sand. There are several beach bars, restaurants, volleyball courts, open-air fitness centre, huge children playground, tennis and basketball courts and wonderful green parks with fountains along the beach. There is the Damlataş Cave just a few steps from the beach. The Damlataş beach is currently the only fully wheelchair friendly beach in Alanya offering easy access, wheelchair sunbeds and showers for disabled people. It is famous for its clear water and possibility to swim along the rocky shore of the peninsula with several caves.
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Herbarium Museum
Herbarium museum has been opened in Alanya in 2012 by Alanya municipality. There are 151 plants and 90 different insects.
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Cleopatra Beach
The most famous beach of Alanya which got its name after the Egyptian Queen Cleopatra. The Queen was so charmed by the beauty of the beach that she used to stop by during her voyage in the Mediterranean to swim in waters near this beach. The Cleopatra Beach is app. 2 km long with fine sand on the beach and in the sea. The water is clear blue and it reaches a depth of an adult human within first 4 – 5 steps. The beach offers many facilities including sunbeds and umbrellas for rent, beach bars, water sports, volleyball courts and a nice walkway along the beach. There are several beach clubs with fine food, drinks, music and comfortable seats and pergolas to spend your whole day too. You can enjoy a great view of the Alanya castle and unforgettable sunsets on the Cleopatra beach in Alanya.
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Alanya Castle
One of the symbols of Alanya – the Alanya castle over the rocky peninsula in the middle of the city. The fortress that you can see today is a remain of 13th century Seljuk fortress built after the conquest of Alanya in 1220 by Alaeddin Keykubat I. However, the very first fortifications have most probably been built by pirates occupying the peninsula in 3rd century BC and later replaced and improved into Byzantine and Roman fortifications over the centuries. The latest Seljuk Alanya castle is app. 250m over the sea level and its walls have great 6,5km in length. There used to be 140 towers along the walls and around 400 cisterns in the castle. The fortifications formed three separated divisions – one for the sultan and his family, one for the army and one for the ordinary people. During the Ottoman era, the Alanya castle was used only for defensive purposes and there were many private villas built within the fortress in the 19th century.
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Fikret Otyam, Ironsmiths Exhibition and Art Gallery
Fikret Otyam, Ironsmiths Exhibition and Art Gallery was opened in 2013 to provide a center of excellence where skilled artisans and craftsmen could work and display their trade and craft and provide an insight into the metalworking world to the general public.
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Antalya Museum
The museum at first operated in the Alâeddin Mosque in 1922, then in Yivli Mosque beginning from 1937, and then moved to its present building in 1972. It was closed to visitors for a wide range of modifications and restorations in 1982.
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Aktur Park
Aktur Park is a funfair in the heart of the city and has a range of rides and attractions on a medium sized location, plenty to keep the kids (and young at heart) entertained for a few hours. With all the traditional stalls, candy floss (cotton candy for our USA friends) and toffee apples etc, some sideshows in the style of "hit the target to win" and there are some well maintained large amusement rides including a small roller-coaster, pirate boats, go-karts and dodgem cars etc. a good mix of rides suitable for all ages. Like most parks like this its most atmospheric in the evenings and night, not to mention it's probably too hot to visit in the daytime anyway.
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Alaeddin Hill
The archaeological excavations carried out by Turkish Historical Society in 1941 showed that the first settlement on the hill goes back to 3000 BC, Early Bronze Age. [1] Later on, the hill had also been used as a settlement area during Phrygian, Hellenistic, Roman, Byzantine, Seljuk and Ottoman eras.
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Mevlana Museum
Mevlevi Derhgahı (Dervish Lodge) and the mausoleum started to function as a museum in 1926 under the name of Konya Museum of Historical Works. In 1954 the display pattern of the museum was once more taken up and it was renamed as the Mevlevi Museum.
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Archangelos Michael Church
Conservation works to the Archangelos Michael Church in Turkish occupied Lefkoniko have been completed. On the October 12, a project completion ceremony of consolidation and conservation works will take place, the Technical Committee on Cultural Heritage, the European Commission and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) have announced. Archangelos Michael Church was included as a conservation project among the very first priorities of the Technical Committee on Cultural Heritage in 2009 together with Arnavut Mosque in Limassol in recognition of the importance of both monuments.
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Kyrenia Castle
Kyrenia Castle is located near the harbour, which is horse shoe shaped. It was originally built by the Romans in the Third century to defend the city, which was located up on the hillside. In the Tenth century, the Byzantines then further enhanced the shape of the castle in order to protect the people of the city from Arab pirates.
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Sagalassos Ancient City (Burdur)
The ancient city of Sagalassos is located in the region known as Pisidia in antiquity. Situated at the edge of a mountainous area, the first settlement traces date back to 12,000 years ago. The ancient city of Sagalassos is extremely well preserved with its monumental structures where almost all of the original building stones can be found.
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Bellapais Abbey
Bellapais Abbey is located in the hillside, 6 miles South East of Kyrenia. The Abbey is the best example of Gothic architecture in Cyprus, as well as being ones of the finest in the Middle East. Built by the Lusignans, the first settlers in Bellapais Abbey were the Agustinas Monks, who escaped from Jerusalem in late Twelth century.
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Kykkos Monastery
Located in the mountainous region of Marathasa Valley, the Monastery of Kykkos is the wealthiest and most lavish on the island, and stands on a mountain peak, at an altitude of 1.318 metres.
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Isparta Museum
A must in Isparta is the Isparta museum. Here you can see excavations from the Persian, Ottoman and Roman times. The museum has four halls: archeology, excavations, ethnography and carpets.
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Isparta mosque
Isparta historical State han mosque is well known tourist attraction.
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Coral Bay Beach
A coast that ranks amongst the loveliest of the region. Located in the Pafos (Paphos) region in Pegeia - a thriving tourist resort - the 500-metre long, Coral Bay Beach is considered to be one of the loveliest coasts of the area. The sands are deep golden, and the clean seawaters here are calm and shallow, making it a popular choice for all, including families with children. The beach is enclosed by a pair of limestone headlands and has abundant greenery, further enhancing its beauty.
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Kyrenia Gate
The Kyrenia Gate in the North Cyprus is one of the three gates on the walls surrounding the old city of Nicosia. This gate was one of the most important entry-exit points of the city. It is also known as the "Del Providetore Gate" after the architecture Proveditore Francesco Barbaro.
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Cyprus Museum
The Cyprus Museum is the island’s main and largest archaeological museum, and charts the development of Cyprus’ civilisation from the Neolithic Age to the Early Byzantine period (7th century).
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Church of St Peter and Paul
This was originally a church built in 1359 with funds donated by a successful merchant called Simon Nostrano during the reign of Pierre I.
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Tombs of the Kings
The famous ‘Tombs of the Kings’ form part of the Archaeological Park of Kato Pafos (Paphos) - one of the most important archaeological sites of Cyprus that has been included in the UNESCO World Heritage Sites list since 1980. The monumental underground tombs are carved out of solid rock and date back to the Hellenistic and Roman periods. Rather than kings, it is actually high ranking officials and aristocracy that were buried here, but the size and splendour of the tombs – some decorated with Doric pillars - gave the locality its grand name. Some of the tombs imitate the houses of the living, with the burial chambers opening onto a peristyle atrium. They are similar to tombs found in Alexandria, demonstrating the close relations between the two cities during the Hellenistic period.
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Paphos Archaeological Museum
The Pafos District Archaeological Museum houses a collection of finds from the Pafos (Paphos) region dating from the Neolithic Age to 1700 AD. The exhibits are set across five rooms and originate mainly from Palaipafos (Kouklia), Nea Pafos (present­ day Pafos) and Marion-Arsinoe (Polis). They are supplemented by finds from Pegeia, Kissonerga, Lempa, Pano Arodes, Salamiou, Akourdalia, Pomos, Kidasi and Geroskipou. The first room covers the Neolithic, Chalcolithic and Bronze Age, including coins cut from the mint of Pafos. The second room houses exhibits from the Iron Age and Classical period, including a tombstone from Marion with the Cyprosyllabic script. The third room presents the Hellenistic and Roman periods, with a rare marble bust of Aphrodite and a marble statue of Asklepios. The fourth room hosts exhibits from the late Roman and early Christian periods, while the newer fifth room showcases pieces from the Byzantine Period and the Middle Ages in general.
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Archaeological Park of Kato Pafos
The Archaeological Park of Kato Pafos (Paphos) is one of the most important archaeological sites of Cyprus and has been included in the UNESCO World Heritage Sites list since 1980. Nicocles, the last King of Palaipafos moved the city from the previous location to its present location near the harbour at the end of the 4th century BC. Between the 2nd century BC and 4th century AD, Pafos was the capital city of Cyprus. The Park includes sites and monuments from the 4th century BC to the Middle Ages, while most remains date to the Roman period. The intricate mosaic floors of four Roman villas (the houses of Dionysos, Theseus, Aion and Orpheus) form the impressive epicentre of the finds, and depict various scenes from Greek Mythology. The complex also includes other important monuments, such as the Asklepieion, the Odeon, the Agora, the Saranta Kolones (Forty Columns) Castle, the Limeniotissa ruins of an Early Christian Basilica, and the Tombs of the Kings.
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Paphos Castle
Standing grandly at the west end of the town’s harbour, Pafos (Paphos) Castle (Medieval Fort) was originally a Byzantine fort built to protect the harbour, and was rebuilt by the Lusignans in the 13th century, but then dismantled by the Venetians. The Ottomans rebuilt it in the 16th century when they conquered the island. What survives today is the 1592 Ottoman restoration of the western Frankish tower with its Venetian additions. An inscription above the only entrance of the castle bears witness to this restoration. The main part of the castle is a big square tower that has an enclosed courtyard in the middle. The ground floor consists of a central hall with small rooms on each of its two long sides, which were used as prison cells during Ottoman Rule. There are 12 battlements on the roof, which received a corresponding number of cannons. The Ottomans removed the cannons in 1878, when they handed over the administration of the island to the British, who used the castle as a salt store until 1935, when it was declared an Ancient Monument under the Antiquities Law.
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Medieval Castle of Paphos
As you eat or walk along the seafront, you will enjoy the view of the medieval castle that adorns the port of Pafos. Pafos Castle was originally a Byzantine fortress, built in 965 AD for the protection of the port. It was completely destroyed by an earthquake in 1222 AD. The castle was rebuilt by the Lusignans around the end of the 12th century to replace the fort of "Forty Columns" for the defence of the island, especially during the Medieval Period (1192-1489). It was destroyed shortly before 1570 by the Venetians, to stop it from being used by the Ottoman Turks, whose invasion of Cyprus was expected. The Turks did indeed invade the island and restored the castle in 1592. They even strengthened it with new fortifications as stated in a Turkish inscription above the entrance. The ground floor consists of a central hall which opened to several small spaces. Under Turkish rule, these were used as prisons. Pafos (Paphos) Castle served as a fortress, as a prison and also as a salt storage area during the period in which the island was a British colony. In 1935 it was declared an ancient monument.
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Agia Paraskevi Church
Located in the village of Geroskipou, this interesting 9th century Byzantine church is a five-domed, three-aisled, barrel-vaulted basilica, making it one of only two such churches on the whole island, and a significant example of Byzantine architecture. The beautiful interior wall paintings date to various periods, from the 8th-15th centuries. A monochrome reddish cross, painted directly on the stone, is of an earlier type and was revealed during restoration works. This type of cross is usually dated to the Early Christian period, up until the 8th-9th century. Apart from its frescoes, the church also contains a rather significant portable, double-sided icon, dating to the 15th century. The Virgin Mary is depicted on one side, and the scene of the Crucifixion on the other. According to tradition, the name Geroskipou (‘sacred garden’ in Greek) derives from the sacred gardens of the Goddess Aphrodite, which were located to the south of the village towards the sea, at the point where the ancient pilgrims began their journey to the sanctuary of Palaipafos (old Pafos). As such, the church may stand on the ruins of an ancient temple dedicated to Aphrodite, although it could also originally have been dedicated to Timios Stavros (the Holy Cross). Today, it is dedicated to the Christian martyr Agia Paraskevi.
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Paphos Waterpark
Paphos Aphrodite Waterpark is the BIGGEST WATERPARK in the Paphos region, a one-of-a-kind naturally landscaped aqua adventure centre. Situated in Kato Paphos on the coastal road easily accessible by car or the local bus which drops off right on our doorstep! This non-stop aquatic thrill features, high-speed water slides, an extensive lazy river, wave surge pool, lots of swimming areas and a spectacular kids water-play area, with food court and beverage areas spread throughout the park connected by a lush, tropical environments that are both immersive and interconnected.
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The Folk Art Museum
The visitors of Lefkara must not fail to see the Patsalos house. It houses the Museum of Popular Art and hosts exquisite embroidery samples, some of which date back to the 19th century.
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Timios Stavros Church
The magnificent Lefkara Church is dedicated to the Holy Cross and dates back to the 14th century. According to the byzantinologist Athanasios Papageorgiou, the eastern part of the Church dates back to the 14th century, named after considering rescued frescoes behind the church’s iconostasis. This date is also confirmed by the metrical “Olivianos’ inscription”, which appears at the bottom of the Lefkara Golden Cross. There is written evidence that Olivianos was a Lefkara Bishop in 1307 during the occupation period by the Franks. This fact is also confirmed undeniably by the founder’s note on a manuscript dating back to the 14th century, which is kept in the Church’s safe. At the end of this manuscript, which is a precious Evangeliary it is noted that it was written in 1345/46 and that the monk Gabriel who was the abbot and the founder of the “Holy and Life-giver Revealed Cross” monastery paid all the expenses. In 1740 the church was restored and the wooden sculptured iconostasis was then made by the Rhodian sculptor Hadjikyriacos who was called in by the church-warden Lourentzos to this end. n 1867 important works were carried out in the church and it was, therefore, expanded in order to have a greater congregation capacity. In 1909 common repair works in the church were deemed necessary and then the entrance was constructed as it appears today. The south door was also built. In 1953 the dome was covered with paintings. The style of the eastern part of the church is cruciform with a cupola, while the style of its more recent part is Cypriot dating back to the 19th century. Furthermore, there are six internal pillars ranged in two rows per three pillars.
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Kourion Archaeological Site
The archaeological remains of Kourion - which was one of the island’s most important city-kingdoms in antiquity - are of the most impressive on the island, and excavations have unearthed many significant finds, which can be viewed at the site.
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Kourion Ancient Amphitheater
One of the most beautiful and interesting for visiting amphitheatres is located in Kourion. It will amaze travellers with its majestic appearance, the beauty of the preserved antique mosaics and the magnificent panoramic view that opens from spectators’ seats.
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Agios Ermogenis
Agios Ermogenis is a picturesque small beach named after the homonymous chapel that lies right above it. Saint (Agios in Greek) Ermogenis is the patron Saint of the athletes.
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Saint Barnabas Monastery & Museum
The Monastery of St. Barnabas is at the opposite side of the Salamis-Famagusta road, by the Royal Tombs. You can easily tell it by its two fairly large domes. It was built to commemorate the foremost saint of Cyprus, whose life was so intertwined with the spread of the Christian message in the years immediately following the death of Christ.
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Limassol City Center
Limassol's historical centre is located around its medieval Limassol Castle and the Old Port. Today the city spreads along the Mediterranean coast and has extended much farther than the castle and port, with its suburbs stretching along the coast to Amathus.
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The Limassol Castle
The Limassol Castle is situated in the centre of old Limassol, is a remnant from the presence of Crusaders on the island. It was built in the 13th century on the site of an earlier Byzantine castle and has been converted today into the Cyprus Medieval Museum.
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The Limassol Marina
The Limassol Marina will provide for the mooring of yachts at sea and on shore. Additionally, the project includes the development of residential, commercial units as well as buildings for cultural uses.