active-pinPinned places
active-place

Museums, Theaters, Architecture in Santo Domingo

Countries:

Dominican Republic
unpinned
Fortaleza Ozama Fortress
Visit the first military fort in the continent and discover more about the Colonial history of Santo Domingo. Erected in front of the mouth of the Ozama River, the Santo Domingo Fortress or Fortaleza Ozama Fortress is the first military construction in the Colony, and one of the World Heritage jewels in the Colonial Area. The simple and solid construction was built by the Spaniards between 1502 and 1507 at the request of the governor Nicolás de Ovando, providing it with a Medieval style. However, during the following centuries, the place was modified and extended until it became an interesting building that you can see today. The main purpose of its construction was to defend the city from the attacks of British, Portuguese and French conquerors, as well as from the pillage of pirates.
unpinned
Museum of Modern Art
The Dominican Republic’s contemporary art museum, the Museum of Modern Art is located in the Plaza de la Cultura, next door to many other museums and the National Theater. It exhibits examples of the best of Dominican art of the 20th century, as well as temporary exhibitions. Before going out to buy Dominican art, educate yourself by browsing through the permanent collections of Dominican masters of art at the Museum of Modern Art.
unpinned
Alcazar de Colon
The Alcázar de Colón is one of the most popular tourist attractions in Santo Domingo. The building dates from 1510 and is the oldest vice-regal residence in the Americas. It was originally the home of Diego Columbus, the governor of the colony and Christopher Columbus’ son.
Have we missed one?
You can add a new place,
sight, landmark, attraction,
things to see
Add a Place
Explore more places related to this search:
unpinned
Sans Souci Palace
Henri Christophe is also the one who ordered the construction of this palace. Although in ruins today, its remnants explain the extent of the territory on which it was built. Two earthquakes (1842 & 1843) seriously destroyed it. This colossal monument was the personal residence of Henri Christophe and was divided into four sections including the King's apartments (Henri Christophe), left pavilion, the Queen's apartments and large stables. It even had a barracks, a hospital, a print shop and more. According to the hearsay, the style of the palace was to compete with the castle of Versailles.
unpinned
Citadelle Laferriere
The Citadelle Laferrière is a mountaintop fortress, located on the northern coast of Haiti - on the top of mountain Bonnet a L’Eveque. Depicted on local currency, stamps and postcards, this amazing structure has become the symbol of Haiti’s power and independence. It was built at the beginning of the 19th century by one of the leaders of Haiti’s slave revolution. The Citadelle Laferrière is also known simply as the Citadelle or as Citadelle Henri Christophe in the honour of its creator. The Citadelle is referred by locals as the Eighth Wonder of the World and in 1982 it was nominated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. This massive stone construction is the largest fortress in the Americas. Built to demonstrate the power of the newly independent Haiti, the Citadelle Laferrière was essential for the security of Haiti’s newly formed state.
unpinned
Casa Bacardi
Casa Bacardi is one of the top attractions near San Juan. Choose from a number of fun and interesting tours. Getting there is easy from Old San Juan – just a short ferry and taxi ride.
unpinned
Old San Juan
Old San Juan, the most popular cruise destination in the Caribbean, is far from a cookie cutter vacation spot. Old San Juan is special in every way, known for it’s rich history, five century old forts, romantic ambiance, Old World elegance, exquisite food, and festive atmosphere.
unpinned
Abel Santamaria Historic Park
Abel Santamaría Historic Park is compounded by the museum, a library and a monument in the place in which you will find the ruins of the Former Saturnino Lora Civil Hospital. The building was built by the end of the 19th century with Neoclassic style and was taken by 23 young men under the command of Abel Santamaría due to its strategic location in relation to the Cuartel Moncada Headquarters in 1953. The museum of the enclosure which binds together all this buildings was opened in 1973 on the occasion of the 20th anniversary of the assault to the Cuartel Moncada Headquarters, and exhibits the history related to the famous assault and the trial of Fidel Castro. The monument opened in 1979 in memory of Abel Santamaría and his colleagues who were tortured and murdered after the failed raising. It has four faces in which there is a sphinx of José Martí, another of Abel Santamaría, six bayonets symbolizing justice; the solitary star and a verse of the National Anthem. The water curtain which seems to support the compound symbolizes the ideals of the young men of the Centenary Generation. The Municipal Library includes the complex, it has a general room dedicated to Literature, a young-children room, a library extension department and another of technical processes.
unpinned
Santiago de Cuba Cathedral
The Nuestra Señora de la Asunción Cathedral stays from the early 20th century in the same place where other temples stood before since the 16th century. However, the repeated assaults of the pirates, the weather and the earthquakes destroyed the previous buildings.
unpinned
Museum of Historical Cuban Atmosphere
Located in front of the Céspedes Park, the Museum of Historical Cuban Atmosphere is one of the most important museums in Santiago de Cuba. The museum is constituted by two antique houses that were built in different times. One is from the 16th century while the other is from the 19th century, and both show the way of life of the centuries in which they were built.
unpinned
Bustamante Museum
24 Tucker Avenue is the former residence of the late Sir Alexander Bustamante. In 1940 Bustamante was held in detention at Up Park Camp for allegedly inciting workers to protest against low wages and poor working conditions. From this location he instructed his attorneys from the legal firm Judah and Randall, to build a home on the half-acre of land he had brought in 1939. Bustamante's attorneys had the house completed within a year and around the same time Bustamante was released from detention camp. The house was at first rented for a couple of years before it was occupied by Bustamante. The building is a contemporary style 3 bedroom, 3 bathroom concrete house with a combined hip and gable end and timber shingle roof finish. Louvre windows are reflected throughout the design, with the exception of the pivoted sash windows of the bathrooms. This Tucker Avenue home now has its place in Jamaica's history because a National Hero lived there and because of the eventful conferences which took place there. The house is now open to the public as the Bustamante Museum and consists of a multimedia exhibition with artifacts on display.
unpinned
Bob Marley Museum
Museum dedicated to the memory of the late Reggae superstar, Robert "Bob" Marley. The museum is located in Marley's original studio where he recorded many of his songs.
unpinned
Devon House
Sitting on 11 lush acres in the capital city, the stately Devon House mansion was the home of Jamaica’s first black millionaire, George Stiebel. It was built in 1881, on what was originally a 51-acre property.
unpinned
National Heroes Park
The area on which the National Heroes Park now stands was once one of the most popular spots in Kingston. For 101 years, the land was the centre for horse racing in Jamaica. It was also the site for other sporting activities such as cricket and cycle racing. Being a place where people naturally gathered, the area was also the venue for travelling circuses that visited the island from time to time. The site was officially renamed the National Heroes Park in 1973 and is now a permanent place for honouring our heroes whose monuments are erected in an area known as the Shrine. Another section, reserved for prime ministers and outstanding patriots, adjoins the Shrine area, to the north.
unpinned
Liberty Hall
Liberty Hall located at 76 King Street, Kingston was the centre of activities for the Kingston division of The U.N.I.A. It was acquired in 1923 for eight hundred pounds sterling (£800). The two-storey building was the first meeting hall in Jamaica that was fully owned and operated by blacks. It was the home to plays, concerts, dances, elocution pieces, adult and children's choirs. One famous play, which took place here, was the "Slave Ship", which recaptured the horrors of the Middle Passage. Liberty Hall was so named because of Garvey's great admiration for the Irish independence movement and the Irish Transport and General Workers Union whose headquarters in Dublin was named Liberty Hall in 1912. It was at this place, described as "the fortress of the militant working class of Ireland" that many plans were made for Irish self-determination, and Garvey saw the U.N.I.A struggle as being akin to that of the Irish. Liberty Hall is decked in colours red, black and green, which are of much significance. The red denotes the blood of the Negro race nobly shed in the past and dedicated to the future; black represents the colour of the skin and green represents a promise of a better life in Africa. This monument stands as a proud reminder to all Jamaicans, and indeed to all visitors of the works and achievements of the great visionary and National Hero the Rt. Excellent Marcus Mosiah Garvey.
unpinned
Trench Town Culture Yard
The Culture Yard today hosts a small museum which presents the phenomenal history of Trench Town along with articles, instruments and furnishing used by Tata Ford, Bob Marley, Peter Tosh and Bunny Wailer. The original 1940's buildings have been restored to their former glory and the site is truly a heritage tourism destination.
unpinned
Fort Charles
The first fort to be erected in Port Royal was Fort Charles. It was built in the late 1650-60 and was originally called Fort Cromwell but was renamed Fort Charles. The fort underwent several changes between 1656 -1670. In 1667, the fort had 36 guns and by 1765 it had 104 guns and a garrison with 500 men.
unpinned
Port Royal
One of the oldest and most historic regions of the country, Port Royal has maintained much of its independence as well as its heritage. Once the enclave of pirates and other outlaws, there is still a strong seafaring tradition. Much of the old city, described in the 17th century as the "wickedest city in the west", lies underwater beside the town, the result of an earthquake that in 1692 swallowed about two-thirds of the then-living space. Since then, another earthquake in 1907, numerous hurricanes, fires, and various population-decimating diseases have plagued the town. Despite all, the waters around Port Royal are a virtual archaeological gold mine, filled with pieces of history that tell of everyday life in the earliest days of English occupation. Port Royal is also home to the Archaeological Division of the Jamaica National Heritage Trust (JNHT), which recently completed a sonar survey of the underwater city, revealing a sunken pirate ship in the Kingston Harbour. To date thousands of artefacts have been recovered, and there are plans to develop a local museum to showcase these items once the research on them is complete.
unpinned
St. Andrews Anglican Church
With all the rich history that’s been written in the Exumas, it’s surprising how few historical sights there are to see in its capital, Georgetown. Like Green Turtle Cay in the Abacos, the Exumas were settled by Loyalists, former American colonists who stayed true to the British Crown in the wake of the Revolutionary War.
unpinned
Rose Hall Great House
Cinnamon Hill has a very historic and celebrated past. The house was built in 1734 by Edward Barrett, ancestor of Elizabeth Barrett-Browning. It was subsequently owned by George Robertson, Joseph Shore, then the Henderson family until it was purchased by John Rollins in the 1960s. Johnny Cash bought the house from Rollins in the early 70s and he and his estate owned it until the Rollins family -Michele Rollins- bought it back in 2012 after the Cashes passed away. Rumour has it there are ghosts living in the house, with many stories told from the Cash’s and other visitors about common sightings. But the real intrigue is the Cinnamon Hill Great House itself. The estate features island architecture, furnishings, native flowers, iridescent hummingbirds and still captures the spirit of the man in black. The interior is frozen in time with family photos, a crocodile Johnny helped catch and even a pair of Johnny’s well-worn work boots.
unpinned
Ahhh Ras Natango Gallery and Garden
The garden is all of that and so much more. Carved in the hillside are terraces for walking and viewing the varied plants. The tour of the garden is 45 minutes to one hour, but visitors generally stay after the guided tour and spend time just looking at the plants and listening to the birds. There are two fantasy gardens. A fairy’s village, between the roots of a huge tree we were forced to cut after Hurricane Ivan in 2003, is a teaching tool for student field trips. They use their imagination to write stories about life in the village. The other is a Dinosaur Era garden. This too is a teaching tool, used to teach about our impact on nature, make students aware about the endangered and extinct animals in Jamaica, and how the pet trade affects wildlife. The garden also has its very own King Tut’s Falls, leading to the Koi Pond. You may even hold our turtles . All paintings in the gallery are for sale. The medium is acrylic on canvas. Paintings reflect the vibrant colors of the island. One section is of Jamaica’s flora and fauna, birders will enjoy paintings of our endemic birds and plant life that have been presented in the gallery.
unpinned
Rastafari Indigenous Village
Visit with Jamaica's Rastafari people. Warm and welcoming, they are happy to share with you their values of equality, healthy living and connectedness with nature. Located just outside Montego Bay, Rastafari Indigenous Village is a living cultural center that offers you an opportunity to experience the Rastafari way of life. Whether you choose a half or full-day tour, you'll have the unique opportunity to connect with Rastafarians and learn more about their culture and values. You'll be introduced to drum makers who create traditional drums by hand, using techniques that have been passed down through generations. You can tour an organic vegetable and herb garden and learn more about why the Rastafari choose to follow a vegan diet, and what are its benefits. You can then have a meal with the Rastafari, and taste for yourself. A small store offers traditional handicrafts and jewellery. The tour concludes with a performance of traditional drumming and singing in the center of the village.
unpinned
Castillo de San Carlos de le Barra
This is a historical castle built in the seventeenth century to protect the residents of Maracaibo from pirate attacks. It was the time when the city was attacked by pirates more often. Later, this castle was used for different purposes in different eras. In the nineteenth century, the Venezuelan army used it for military purposes. Then during Juan Vicenre Gomez’s dictatorship, it served as a prisoner for political antagonists. The government declared the Castillo de San Carlos de le Barra a National Historic Landmark in 1965.
unpinned
Martello Tower
The Martello Tower is situated on the south coast of Barbuda. It was built in the early 1800s as a defence base for the British, to stand guard over the river landing, the island’s original quay. Its name was derived from a tower Cape Martella in Corsica, that the British had difficulty in taking in 1974. The current fort was erected on the site of a preexisting fort, presumed to have been built by the Spanish, dating back to 1745. The 32-foot tall tower commands great views over most of the island. The fort, which was once armed with three guns, is placed near a small stream which only appeared in wet weather.
unpinned
Barbuda Caves
The caves and other Historical sites that runs along the sea cliff are full of History. Visitors can see several species of animals that is indigenous to Barbuda.
unpinned
Museum of Antigua and Barbuda
The Museum, located in downtown St. John’s, provides an interesting background of the nation’s history from 10,000 years ago.
unpinned
Nelson's Dockyard
Fully restored to its original splendor, the eighteenth- and nineteenth-century buildings of the Dockyard house modern amenities such as shops, hotels, and marina businesses. Outside the dockyard, historic forts dot the landscape of the park accessible by hiking trails which allow visitors to enjoy the park's scenic and natural beauty.
unpinned
Museum of Contemporary Art of Zulia
The Museum of Contemporary Art of Zulia is a national institution of multiple cultural actions designed to insert itself deeply into the community. MACZUL is a cultural project born in Maracaibo thanks to the initiative of the University of Zulia. The MACZUL art collection is mostly made up of high-quality contemporary artworks of aesthetic and creative significance or of documentaries, historical, technical and/or didactic importance, such as paintings, sculptures, drawings, engravings, designs, prints, illustrations, photographs, textiles, fireworks, video art and experimental non-objective artistic manifestations.
unpinned
Plaza del Rosario de Nuestra Senora de Chiquinquira
This is a beautiful plaza with several wonderful sculptures. It is located near the Santa Barbara Church and has beautiful fountains around it. The plaza is home to the Virgin of Chiquinquira’s monument which is 18 meters tall. Then there are some nymphs with wings around the monument that are paying a tribute to the Virgin.
unpinned
Lovers Park
Lovers’ Park (also called Santander Park) was built in the early 20th century and is characterized by a statue of General Francisco de Paula Santander and a bust of former President Manuel Murillo Toro in the centre.
unpinned
Bahama Crafts Centre
Downtown Nassau isn’t the only place known for a fabulous straw market! Conveniently located across the street from Marina Village on Paradise Island is The Bahamas Craft Centre. It features Bahamian handicrafts, conch shell jewelry, Junkanoo art, wooden carvings, clothing, straw work, souvenirs, and more. It’s also a place where you can both test your bargaining skills and watch local artisans work their magic. Located across the street from Marina Village and next to Anthony’s Grill and Dunkin’ Donuts, The Bahamas Craft Centre is quite recognizable, because even from the outside it has a style all its own. Noted architect Jackson Burnside of Doongalik Studios designed the large Art Deco building that is painted in many shades of pastel yellows, oranges, and pinks. Overall it has a more quiet and sedate atmosphere than its larger cousin on Bay Street in Nassau. The Bahamas Craft Centre features approximately 100 booths selling everything from clothing to woven straw goods and everything in between. You’ll find Bahamian handicrafts, paintings, sea treasures, blown glass, conch shell jewelry, rum cakes and candies, Junkanoo art, steel drums, candles, driftwood paintings, straw work, and pine seed dolls, as well as Androsia, a unique Bahamian fabric.
unpinned
Straw Market
Right in the middle of the high-end and boutique shops on Nassau’s Bay Street you’ll find the world-famous Straw Market. It’s home to handmade Bahamian crafts, gifts, souvenirs, and items such as hand-woven straw hats, bags, mats, dolls, conch shell jewelry, and wood carvings—and all available at very reasonable prices, especially if you’re good at negotiating! Located on Bay Street in downtown Nassau, The Nassau Straw Market is an authentic representation of an industry that has been growing throughout The Bahamas and the Caribbean since the early 1940′s. Originally, the craft and skills of plaiting, braiding, and weaving were useful when Bahamians led subsistence lifestyles, with baskets being used for carrying fruit and fishing traps. But following the end of World War II, many North Americans began visiting The Bahamas for their vacations, and straw craft souvenirs soon grew in popularity.
unpinned
Heritage Museum of the Bahamas
The Heritage Museum of The Bahamas opened in July 2014 and is the foundation of Graycliff new Heritage Village. Located in the historically preserved Mountbatten House opposite the Graycliff Hotel on West Hill Street, the museum offers visitors an in depth look at the history and heritage of The Bahamas, ranging from the prehistoric times to the present. Browse the collection of Hamilton White, a well-known British antiques collector, his expansive collection greatly complements the history of West Hill Street with fossils, relics and treasures spanning the centuries. The oldest of artefacts being a slice of a meteorite, which is approximately 4.5 billion years old! The timeline explores natural history, the days of Columbus, the piracy era, slavery and plantation life, the Maritimes of the 18th century, life in the Out Islands during the early 1900’s, the days of the Duke of Windsor, the Royal Air Force, Bahamas Speed Weeks, and so much more.
unpinned
Pigeon Island Natonal Park
Pigeon Island National Landmark is heralded as one of the most important monuments of Saint Lucia’s history. It is a vivid representation of the cultural and historical monuments of international, civil, military and marine cross currents, characteristic of West Indian historical change. A living museum within a natural setting, Pigeon Island is being nurtured through careful protection and intelligent development to serve the intellectual, cultural and recreational needs of all who visit this historic site. The picturesque, 44 acre island reserve, off the North West, was originally surrounded by water but was joined to the mainland by a man-made causeway in 1972. Recognizing the need to secure this site where the balance of late eighteenth century naval power was decided, the Government of Saint Lucia designated Pigeon Island as a National Park in 1979 and as a National Landmark in 1992. Pigeon Island National Landmark has a number of heritage attractions and amenities which include: Ruins of military buildings used during the battles between the French and the British for the island of Saint Lucia; Two beautiful beaches; A restaurant featuring local cuisine; A pub and restaurant with a historical theme and a lookout point at the top of the Fort which gives a panoramic view of the Northwest coastline.
unpinned
East End Lighthouse Park
The first lighthouse on Grand Cayman was erected at Gun Bluff in the early 1900s, which is approximately a half-mile from the present site of the East End Lighthouse Park. This was required under the Justices and Vestry’s East End Light Law (1906). A 60-foot ship’s mast stood on the Bluff and William James Watler was hired as a lightkeeper to ensure that a kerosene lantern was hoisted to the top of the mast at 6:00pm every evening and lowered at 6:00am every morning. A fine “not exceeding forty shillings” was to be imposed on him if it was discovered that he had been lax in his duties. The light could be seen 10 miles out to sea. The lighthouse at Gorling Bluff served until 1937, when the British Government gave order for five modern “navigational lights” to be erected around the coasts of all three Cayman Islands. The lights were to be placed on Crown Property, however, so that same year the Crown acquired Gorling Bluff. The replacement lighthouse was constructed by Mr. Morell from England, and it is this light which serves to the present day, though it is now solar-powered. Part of the wooden frame of the previous lighthouse remains, but the old kerosene lamp is now in the Cayman Islands National Museum.
unpinned
Pedro St. James
Discover the unique heritage and culture of Cayman via this lovingly restored window into the 18th century that’s only a 20-minute drive from George Town. At a time in the Cayman Islands when most people lived in tiny, thatch-covered houses, a wealthy Englishman, using slave labour from Jamaica, created an astonishing 3-storey building called Pedro St. James. In the 1990s, the Government of the Cayman Islands purchased Pedro St. James and painstakingly restored the Great House to the splendour of its 18th-century heritage. Today, visitors can stroll through the imposing edifice with its period furniture and authentic artefacts to experience what life was like so long ago in Cayman’s history.